- The Washington Times - Monday, September 11, 2000

Western Union hacked, credit cards copied

DENVER Western Union yesterday said hackers made electronic copies of the credit-and debit-card information of 15,700 customers who transferred money on a company Web site.

The company began calling and sending e-mail to affected customers over the weekend, and by late yesterday had informed Visa and MasterCard of the accounts involved.

Only Web-site users who conducted on-line transactions would have been affected, company officials said. They said the hackers broke in while the site was undergoing maintenance and was unprotected.

Western Union spokesman Peter Ziverts said no cases of credit-card fraud had been reported to the Englewood, Colo.-based company as of last evening. Visa International and MasterCard International Inc. have begun monitoring customers' accounts for possible fraudulent use, he said.

After 18 years, 'Cats' calls it quits

NEW YORK "Now and forever" is here and gone.

"Cats," Broadway's longest-running show, hung up its whiskers, tails and toe shoes yesterday after nearly 18 years and a record 7,485 performances.

It was an emotional weekend at the Winter Garden Theater, starting with the Saturday matinee, where the audience included alumni from the musical's Broadway and touring productions.

The Saturday evening performance was a special benefit for the Actors' Fund, the theater service organization that takes care of entertainment professionals. And the final performance yesterday was by invitation only.

"Cats," with music by Andrew Lloyd Webber, is based on "Old Possum's Book of Practical Cats," a collection of poems by T.S. Eliot. Even though he died in 1965, he received a Tony Award 18 years later for his contributions to the score. His widow became a very wealthy woman, receiving royalties from a show that has grossed more than $380 million on Broadway alone.

Boy saves sister from yellow jackets

TRAVERSE CITY, Mich. An 11-year-old boy is credited with saving his little sister from swarming yellow jackets that stung her at least 50 times.

Lauren Bell, 7, was camping with her family in Michigan last month when she slipped down a ravine and landed on a hive of bees. Andrew Bell pulled his sister to a nearby river, put her in the water and brushed off the bees. He was stung 15 times himself.

The sixth-grader said his idea to jump in the river came from a science lesson at school last year. "I knew if bees got their wings wet they couldn't fly," he said. "I thought the best thing to do was to get in the water."

Lauren, who spent two days in a hospital, continues to recover.

Restaurant closes nine years after killings

KILLEEN, Texas Luby's Cafeteria, the restaurant where 23 customers were killed nine years ago by a deranged gunman, has closed, falling victim to competition from other restaurants.

Customers lined up almost out the door at lunch Friday to have their favorite menu items one last time.

The mass killing occurred shortly after George Hennard drove his truck through the window of the cafeteria's dining area during the lunch hour Oct. 16, 1991.

Sharpton vows boycott of Burger King

MIAMI The Rev. Al Sharpton said yesterday he will call for a boycott of Burger King if the world's No. 2 fast-food chain does not discuss its attempt to revoke a black owner's franchises.

The dispute centers on Detroit restaurant owner La-Van Hawkins, who filed a $500 million lawsuit against Burger King in April. He contends the restaurant courted him because of his race for a deal to open 225 inner-city restaurants and then used it against him to squelch his dream of owning a large string of Burger Kings in underserved communities.

Burger King countersued. The restaurant wants Mr. Hawkins to return its property and says he owes more than $6.5 million from a loan given in 1998. Mr. Hawkins has been also sued by suppliers who say he has not paid his bills.

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