- The Washington Times - Monday, September 18, 2000

Gunmen kidnap 30 in Colombia

CALI, Colombia Gunmen yesterday kidnapped at least 30 persons from two restaurants located in the weekend playground of the well-to-do outside Colombia's third-largest city in an operation blamed on leftist rebels.

At least one of those seized is an American, a relative said.

About 50 armed men, many wearing military-style uniforms and bulletproof vests, barged into the restaurants in the highlands outside Cali yesterday, police said. Gunmen also seized a couple from a nearby farm Eduardo de Lima and wife Elena.

Mrs. de Lima, formerly of Timonium, moved to Colombia when she married her husband, her cousin, David Luria of Washington, said by telephone.

South Korea breaks ground on cross-border rail

IMJINGAK, South Korea In the latest sign of improving relations between North and South Korea, workers began rebuilding a railway line across the world's most heavily armed border today to connect the two Korean capitals for the first time in more than 50 years.
South Korea's president, Kim Dae-jung, presided over the groundbreaking ceremony in Imjingak, a village just south of the Demilitarized Zone, which has separated the two Koreas since the 1945 division of the peninsula.
The railway was cut off shortly before the start of the 1950-53 Korean War.
When completed by next fall, the railway and a new four-lane highway running beside it will link the Southern capital Seoul to the Northern capital Pyongyang.

Heavy fighting reported in northwest Colombia

BOGOTA, Colombia Government troops were engaged in heavy combat yesterday against leftist rebels in the jungles of northwest Colombia, with casualties reported high on both sides.
Gen. Nestor Ramirez, second-in-command of the army, said that 19 government soldiers were confirmed dead, and that fighting was continuing. RCN television said government forces had lost contact with 44 soldiers.
The clashes between the army and rebels of the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia were centered around the town of Dabeiba, located 95 miles southeast of the Panamanian border.

Herpes vaccine works for women, not men

TORONTO Researchers have made the first vaccine that protects against genital herpes. But there is a major catch: It works only in women and only if they have never had cold sores.
The findings, reported yesterday, are a surprise. Until now, no vaccine has ever been shown to work in one sex but not the other. Experts say this could present unexpected trouble for creating other vaccines for sexually transmitted diseases, such as AIDS.
The results were not the clear home run that the vaccine's developer, SmithKline Beecham, had hoped when it began designing the latest studies a decade ago. Nevertheless, doctors say a vaccine that offers even partial protection against a chronic disease is noteworthy.

Ang Lee wins award at film festival

TORONTO "Crouching Tiger, Hidden Tiger," Ang Lee's historical action-romance set during the Qing dynasty in China, was named yesterday as winner of the People's Choice Award at the Toronto International Film Festival.
Mr. Lee is a native of Taiwan best known for such English-language movies as "The Ice Storm" and "Sense and Sensibility." His current film stars Chow Yun-Fat as a martial arts warrior who longs to retire.
"The Dish," an Australian comedy about the 1969 moon landing, finished second among audience voters.

Pageant winner shot in Russia

MOSCOW An unidentified gunman shot and killed a former Miss Russia in the entrance to her apartment building in the Volga River city of Cheboksary, police said yesterday.
Alexandra Petrova, 20, won the Miss Russia pageant in 1996.
One of the persons accompanying her was also killed in the attack late Saturday night, said a duty officer with the city police in Cheboksary, about 250 miles east of Moscow. The gunman escaped. The officer gave no other details.

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