- The Washington Times - Thursday, August 16, 2001

High fidelity
Tucked in between the latest Fuel single or Staind tune on local radio, some catchy numbers by Baltimore band Fidel have been making the rounds. With a polished sound that stands up to those headlining acts, and taking cues from the Police, Sublime, Bob Marley and the Beatles, the group is poised to hit the big time with their self-titled debut album. Hear them live with EBO and Cactus Patch when doors open at 6 p.m. Saturday at the Black Cat, 1831 14th St. NW. Tickets are $6. 202/667-7960 for information, 202/432-SEAT for tickets.

Duke's place

Long before punk rockers claimed the District as their musical capital, band leader Duke Ellington was making the streets of Washington come alive with jazz and big band sounds. Celebrate that legacy by taking a tour through the Shaw neighborhood, visiting some of the more important landmarks in Mr. Ellington's life. Groups leave at 9 a.m. Saturday from the Ronald Reagan Building and International Trade Center, 13th Street and Pennsylvania Avenue NW. Tickets are $39.95. For reservations, call 202/638-7348.

Wild green yonder

If the words "U.S. Air Force Band" automatically conjure up thoughts of military marches and John Philip Sousa tunes in your head, then perhaps it's time to check out the concert band in action. Steering clear of marches, the band goes Irish to tackle the music of "Riverdance," promising some stunning solo vocal and trumpet work. Hear them at 7 p.m. Saturday at Market Square, 301 King St., Alexandria. It's free. 202/767-5658.

Bread and wine

Wine snobs may say the best wine is in California or Europe, but Virginians know they don't have to go farther than the nearest grocery store to pick up some quality spirits. More than 350 wines from pretty much every vineyard in the state will be open to tasting at the 26th Annual Virginia Wine Festival. Stop by for a taste (as well as live music, arts and crafts) from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday and Sunday at Great Meadow, off Route 245, Middleburg, Va. Tickets are $5-$20. 800/520-9670.

War stories

Many Washingtonians know that the British burnt much of the city down during the War of 1812, but few are aware of what happened before. When the English won a strong victory at the Battle of Bladensburg back in August of 1814, it paved the way for the attack on the capital. Watch historical interpreters recreate what camp life was like on the eve of that battle from noon to 4 p.m. Saturday at the Riversdale House Museum, 6005 48th Ave., Riverdale Park. Admission is $1-$3. 301/864-0420.

Trees on paper

It may be too hot to take a long stroll through the U.S. National Arboretum this weekend, but that's only more reason to see some of the indoor exhibits. In "Asian Accent: Botanical Art on Silk," you can beat the heat by viewing the incredible silk drawings of plants and nature, produced using colorful dyes. See them from 10 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Saturday and Sunday at the Arboretum, 3501 New York Ave. NE. It's free. 202/245-2726.

Rich woman, poor man

The plot may seem simple a wealthy woman falls in love with a poor man, but her father stands in the way of their uniting. In the romantic comedy "Holiday," though, a few twists have been added to this tale of love lost and found during the Roaring '20s. See it at 2 and 8 p.m. Saturday and 2 and 7:30 p.m. Sunday at the Olney Theatre Center, 2001 Olney-Sandy Spring Road, Olney. Tickets are $25-$29. 301/924-3400.

When dinosaurs ruled

The name sure is a mouthful, but you don't have to be able to say "Parasaurolophus" to enjoy seeing the three-ton giant come to life. Based on bones found on public lands, the Department of the Interior Museum is showing off its find, along with displays and exhibits focusing on dinosaur life. See it from 1 to 4 p.m. Saturday at the museum, 1849 C St. NW. Admission is free. 202/208-4743.

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