- The Washington Times - Thursday, August 16, 2001

Group urges ban on use of brain tissue
A consumer advocacy group yesterday urged U.S. health officials to ban the use of tissue taken from cadaver brains in surgery, saying it raised the risk of a disorder related to mad cow disease.
Public Citizen petitioned the Food and Drug Administration, asking the agency to ban the use of dura mater, the membrane that protects the brain and spinal cord, that has been removed from cadavers and to recall it from hospitals.
At least 114 persons, including three in the United States, have died from Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, or CJD, after having surgery where the tissue was used.

Group sues Florida over voter notices
MIAMI — A liberal Florida group sued state officials yesterday, claiming that parts of an election reform law smacked of "Jim Crow" segregation.
The plaintiffs object to a list of voter responsibilities that will be posted at polling places along with a list of voter rights. They said the signs amount to literacy tests and will discourage minority voters.
Signs will direct voters, among other things, to "study and know candidates and issues," "bring proper identification to the polling station" and check their completed ballots for accuracy.
"We believe that the voter responsibilities section of that act is a step so far backward as to be a literacy test," said JoNel Newman, a lawyer with the Florida Equal Voting Rights Project, a project of the American Civil Liberties Union of Florida.
The lawsuit also targets new procedures for removing ex-felons from voter rolls.

E. coli outbreak tied to county fair
MILWAUKEE — Eight persons who attended a county fair were sickened in an E. coli outbreak, and 51 other illnesses were being investigated, health officials said yesterday. Three children were hospitalized.
The Ozaukee County health department said the confirmed cases were among people who attended the Ozaukee County Fair Aug. 1-5, but the source of the bacteria was still being investigated.
Children's Hospital of Wisconsin has treated five children with potentially deadly E. coli infections, a spokeswoman said.

Jones revives bid to get $1 million
NEW YORK — Paula Jones revived legal efforts yesterday to force imprisoned New York real estate mogul Abe Hirschfeld to pay her the $1 million he promised for dropping her sexual harassment case against President Clinton.
In her latest move, the Arkansas resident sued Hirschfeld in Manhattan federal court for breaching the agreement the two signed on Oct. 31, 1998.
The lawsuit seeks $1 million, plus unspecified interest and legal costs. Mrs. Jones had filed a similar lawsuit in Dallas federal court last year, but it was dismissed in September when the trial judge ruled he did not have jurisdiction over Hirschfeld.
Hirschfeld, 81, was sentenced last year to a prison term of one to three years for trying to hire a hit man to murder his former business partner.

Ex-officer doubts Louima witness
NEW YORK A former police sergeant testified yesterday that he repeatedly tried to warn his bosses that a key witness who implicated an officer in the Abner Louima assault was unreliable.
Patrick Walsh told a federal judge that the witness, Patrolman Eric Turetzky, at first couldn't identify the officer who led Mr. Louima to the Brooklyn precinct bathroom where he was held down and sodomized with a broomstick. Mr. Walsh said Mr. Turetzky told him it was either Officer Charles Schwarz or Officer Thomas Wiese.
"But he had seen them from behind and he couldn't say which one it was because they have the same hair color and same hairstyle," said Mr. Walsh. Mr. Turetzky testified at trial that Schwarz was definitely the perpetrator.
Schwarz is serving 15 years in prison, and Mr. Walsh's account is central to his appeal. Defense attorneys have accused prosecutors of suppressing evidence that Schwarz was a victim of mistaken identity.

LOAD COMMENTS ()

 

Click to Read More

Click to Hide