- The Washington Times - Monday, December 3, 2001

Anthrax found at postal facility
HARTFORD, Conn. Trace amounts of anthrax were found at a postal facility that sorts mail for the town where a 94-year-old woman mysteriously died of the disease last month, officials said yesterday.
Ottilie Lundgren, of Oxford, was the fifth person in the nation to die since the anthrax scare began in October. The source of her exposure has baffled officials.
The spores were found on sorting machines during tests at the Southern Connecticut Processing and Distribution Center in Wallingford. The trace amounts were most likely left on the machines when a letter sent to Seymour, near Oxford, passed through the facility on Oct. 11, said Jon Steele, vice president of the Postal Service's Northeast Area Operations.
On Friday, officials announced they had found a single spore of anthrax on a letter sent to a Seymour residence a few miles from the home of the elderly woman. Connecticut Gov. John Rowland said the Seymour letter could have been tainted when it went through a sorting machine at a postal facility near Trenton, N.J.

Study finds teens heed no-smoking advice
CHICAGO Defying the stereotype of the defiant teen-ager, new research suggests teens are less likely to smoke if they think their parents disapprove of the habit.
Parental disapproval works even if the parents themselves are smokers; the disapproval can also blunt the effect of peer pressure, shown previously to be a strong influence on whether teens take up smoking, the study published in December's issue of Pediatrics found.
"We overrate the rebelliousness of teen-agers," said Dr. James Sargent, associate professor of pediatrics at Dartmouth Medical School.
Dr. Sargent and researcher Madeline Dalton surveyed 372 rural Vermont youngsters in 1996, in grades four through 11, who had never smoked. The youngsters were re-questioned in the following two years.
In the earlier interviews, 284 of those surveyed said their parents disapproved of children smoking; by the final survey, 19 percent of them had become established smokers. By contrast, 27 percent of the 41 youngsters who initially said their parents were lenient about smoking ended up becoming established smokers.

Yates hearing set for today
HOUSTON Attorneys for Andrea Yates, the woman who police say drowned her five children, are accusing prosecutors of seeking the death penalty in bad faith as a ploy to ensure a conviction.
The accusation is part of a defense motion, one of 34 to be considered at a pretrial hearing today, that seeks to keep potential jurors who oppose or question the death penalty from being removed from the jury pool.
Mrs. Yates, 37, faces two capital murder charges for drowning her children in the family's bathtub in June. Her trial is set for Jan. 7. She has pleaded not guilty by reason of insanity.

Harrison's family invites meditation
LOS ANGELES George Harrison's family thanked fans for their affectionate tributes and invited them to take part today in a minute of meditation in tribute to the late Beatle.
"We are deeply touched by the outpouring of love and compassion from people around the world," wife Olivia Harrison and son Dhani Harrison said.
The statement was released late Saturday by family friend Gavin de Becker.
"Olivia and Dhani invite you to join them in a minute of silence at 1:30 p.m. PST," Mr. de Becker said.

Nephew of Cochran killed in L.A. park
LOS ANGELES A 16-year-old nephew of well-known attorney Johnnie Cochran was shot and killed while riding a bicycle through a Los Angeles park, a police department spokesman said yesterday.
Sean Cochran had been riding with a friend Saturday night when a gunman stepped out of a car, shot both teen-agers, then fled the scene. The friend also died in the shooting.
Johnnie Cochran was a member of the legal team that defended former professional football player O.J. Simpson in his 1994 murder trial.

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