- The Washington Times - Wednesday, February 7, 2001

Witness says bin Laden ordered civilian deaths

NEW YORK A former terrorist testified yesterday that Saudi exile Osama bin Laden issued a series of religious decrees in the early 1990s urging Muslims to wage war against "the snake" America.

Jamal Ahmed Fadl said bin Laden and his lieutenants told their troops to kill innocent people who were in the way.

"You should do it and not worry about it," he recalled being told.

Mr. Fadl was the government's first witness at the trial of four men accused in the 1998 bombings of two U.S. embassies in Africa. Twelve Americans were among 224 persons killed when the bombs went off nearly simultaneously in Nairobi, Kenya, and Dar es Salaam, Tanzania.

Mr. Fadl, a Sudanese, provided a rare glimpse into bin Laden's group, al Qaeda, and described himself as an early member.

'Survivor' contestant files suit against show

SAN FRANCISCO The Tribal Council may have spoken, but "Survivor" contestant Stacey Stillman hopes to have the last word.
Miss Stillman, a 27-year-old lawyer who was the third contestant booted off "Survivor" during the first round of the blockbuster CBS series last summer, has filed suit in San Francisco Superior Court claiming producers rigged the selection process to bolster the show's demographic appeal.
"The producers of 'Survivor' engaged in a scheme for the purpose of prearranging or predetermining its outcome, by influencing, persuading, or intimidating contestants to cast votes," Miss Stillman's suit says.
CBS characterized her claims as baseless, saying she was pursuing "a frivolous and groundless lawsuit."
Specifically, Miss Stillman charged that "Survivor" Executive Producer Mark Burnett strong-armed contestants Dirk Been and Sean Kenniff to switch their votes to protect 72-year-old Rudy Boesch the grizzled former Navy SEAL who ended up among the final four contestants on the show.
Miss Stillman says Mr. Burnett moved to save Mr. Boesch, the oldest contestant on "Survivor," to cater to a "critical demographic in the viewing audience, particularly in the latter days of the show."

Relative may testify that Skakel confessed

GREENWICH, Conn. Several witnesses are prepared to say that Kennedy nephew Michael Skakel admitted involvement in the 1975 killing of neighbor Martha Moxley, the Greenwich Time reported yesterday.
The paper, citing unidentified sources, said the witnesses will support two men who have already said in court that Mr. Skakel confessed to them while in a drug rehabilitation center.
The paper said one of the witnesses is a relative of Mr. Skakel's, but did not say how the others are linked to him.
Mr. Skakel was charged in the killing in January 2000 and later arraigned as a juvenile. A judge ruled last week that his case should be transferred to adult court, saying Connecticut has no juvenile facility where it could send Mr. Skakel, now 40, if he is convicted.
Mr. Skakel is a nephew of the late Robert F. Kennedy and his widow, Ethel.

2 Republicans press for limits on RU-486

Two Republican lawmakers are pushing for a limit on doctors who can prescribe the "abortion pill," contending that earlier government approval of the drug omitted necessary safeguards.
Pro-choice activists immediately denounced the proposed legislation as an attempt to limit access to the drug mifepristone, also called RU-486, which was approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in September after years of debate.
The bill, co-sponsored by Sen. Tim Hutchinson of Arkansas and Rep. David Vitter of Louisiana, requires that a doctor prescribing RU-486 must be qualified to handle complications from incomplete abortions and be authorized to perform abortions. The physician also must have admitting privileges at a nearby hospital.
The FDA said in its approval that prescribing doctors should be able to refer patients for surgical abortions or admission to hospitals.

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