- The Washington Times - Thursday, July 12, 2001

As the storm gathers, you can almost hear the sound of the self-created deluge that seems all but certain to drown Rep. Gary Condit. It seems like we already know too much, and yet we barely know anything.

The pace of the investigation surrounding intern Chandra Levy's disappearance has thus far been set by Mr. Condit, and has only recently accelerated. He has been interviewed by police three times, two of which may have been unnecessary had the congressman displayed a modicum of candor from the outset. Instead, Mr. Condit sought to flout the odds and conceal for over two months the truth that virtually everyone in America had already come to take for granted. Why is it again that no one trusts politicians?

Condit attorney Abbe Lowell insists that he has been fully cooperative with D.C. police. That's funny, because we almost seem to be back to the definition of "is" territory. To be fully cooperative is not to lie in two out of three interviews about the most relevant detail concerning Mr. Condit's relationship with the intern. So now, in the wake of Chandra's aunt Linda Zamsky's startling account of the affair, he's coming clean.

At this point, to quell the suspicion and disgust that have been stalking Mr. Condit at every turn, he is having to go the extra mile. This means full disclosure: phone records, inviting a search of his apartment on Tuesday, submitting to a polygraph and DNA tests — and maybe even giving a press conference instead of hiding behind pro forma statements issued by aides and attorneys.

And as long as we have the momentum, Mr. Condit and Mr. Lowell the answer man could come up with some alternative explanations, just to help police out that much more. Right now America has one idea; one man remains, officially, not a suspect. Gary Condit, the ball is in your court.

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