- The Washington Times - Monday, July 2, 2001

The most infamous rapist in Arkansas history — with a bizarre connection to Bill Clinton — goes to court in Kansas City, Mo., tomorrow amid rumors that police there plan to file murder charges against him.
Wayne Dumond, 51, remained in Clay County jail in Smithville as authorities pieced together evidence some thought could tie him to two recent Kansas City area murders.
Kansas City police spokesman Steve Young said Dumond was being held only on a parole violation warrant but was being questioned in a homicide investigation. Tomorrow's court appearance will deal only with the parole situation, Mr. Young said.
Meanwhile, sources in Kansas City verified that DNA material matching Dumond's was found under the fingernails of Carol Shields, 39, who was killed on Sept. 20.
"Once that match jumped out at us, we got to looking at him closer and we think he might be involved in a second murder here just last week," said one policeman. That was the death of Sara Andrasek, 23, a recent college graduate, in nearby Platte County.
According to detectives and search warrants for the premises of a construction company where Dumond had been employed and his home, both women had been sexually molested before being slain, were left nude and were in proximity to where Dumond worked.
Both women had been bound, but the materials used to tie them were missing when police arrived. The first woman was determined to have died of asphyxia; the second victim's cause of death has not been released. Both were killed in apartments in the Northland area.
Searching the Edgerton construction offices, police discovered a plastic tie similar to one that they thought was used to bind Mrs. Shields and rope similar to a small piece found at the scene of the Andrasek murder.
Bruce Houdek, a Kansas City lawyer representing Dumond, said his client denies any connection to the two murders. "I understand you can buy that stuff at any hardware store," he said in reference to what police removed from the construction company's offices.
Human tissue, which did not belong to Mrs. Shields, was discovered under her fingernails. A genetic profile was sent to the FBI's DNA database, then checked with the Arkansas State Crime Lab, which had Dumond's tissue samples on file. Police in Kansas City were informed of the match on Friday and immediately arrested Dumond.
The parole violation warrant was based on evidence linking Dumond to a homicide, said Tim Kniest, a spokesman for the Missouri Department of Corrections.
Dumond's 1984 rape conviction in Forrest City, Ark., became a political nightmare because the victim was a 17-year-old cheerleader and distant cousin to Gov. Clinton, and Dumond was castrated before he was tried.
Dumond claimed he recognized voices of masked men who broke into his home and assaulted him, though nobody was arrested. He later won a civil lawsuit against St. Francis County Sheriff Coolidge Conlee, who had proudly displayed Dumond's testicles in a jar on his desk.
After Dumond was convicted and sentenced to life in prison plus 20 years, DNA specialists convinced Arkansas officials of his innocence. The man who followed Mr. Clinton in the statehouse, Jim Guy Tucker, commuted Dumond's sentence to 39 years, claiming he had "serious questions about his guilt."
Then Mr. Tucker set into motion a process to free Dumond. The victim's family and other influential Arkansans protested loudly, but Arkansas parole officials agreed in 1997 that they would release Dumond if another state would allow him to live there. Both Florida and Texas refused to accept Dumond, so he was forced to remain in prison until the state parole board released him in 1999. Dumond moved to Smithville, Mo., just north of Kansas City, last August.
Smithville police Chief Ken Wilson said Dumond had not been involved in any disturbances since moving there.
"You wouldn't even know he was there," said the chief.

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