- The Washington Times - Sunday, July 29, 2001

Ex-soldiers storm Haiti police school
PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti — Six former members of Haiti's military stormed a police academy barracks early yesterday, killing three police officers and wounding several others, police sources said.
Police and other witnesses said the armed group arrived at the academy in suburban Petionville between 3:30 a.m. and 4 a.m. and attacked a SWAT-team compound within the academy, where they shot and killed a police chief, an officer, and a SWAT-team student. After the shootout, the former soldiers fled.
Haiti's army has been a touchy subject since a military coup ousted President Jean-Bertrand Aristide when he first served as president in 1991. Mr. Aristide disbanded the military after a U.S.-led invasion returned him to power in 1994. Last March, several thousand former military officers seized the streets of the capital.

Nigerian journalists boycott government
KANO, Nigeria — Journalists in a northern Nigerian state that last year introduced strict Islamic law called sharia said yesterday they have begun a boycott of government activities there.
The Zamfara State chapter of the Nigeria Union of Journalists (NUJ) said the boycott began on Friday to protest harassment of their members by authorities in the state.
"Many of our members have gone underground following allegations of anti-Islamic or anti-sharia activities by the government," chapter spokesman Sadi'u Mohammed said.
"It seems that government is trying indirectly to censor us by labeling us anti-sharia any time we write anything against the government."
He said the government's attitude is adversely affecting journalists' reporting and that they have decided to stop covering government activities.

Pakistani ex-minister shot to death
ISLAMABAD, Pakistan — Unidentified gunmen yesterday shot and killed Mohammad Siddiq Kanju, former Pakistani minister of state for foreign affairs and a former provincial legislator in central Punjab province, police said.
Mr. Kanju, who served in the 1990-93 government of Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif, died on the way to the hospital after four assailants sprayed his car with bullets in Karoor Pakka town in Multan district.
A former member of the Punjab assembly, Aslam Joya, also succumbed to bullet wounds while being driven to the hospital, Deputy Inspector General of Police Multan Shaukat Javed said.
Political sources here said the slayings could be linked to local politics as Mr. Kanju was contesting for mayorship in the city.

India says talks hinge on terrorism
NEW DELHI — India's ruling BJP yesterday backed the government for holding peace talks with Pakistan, but said further talks should hinge on the neighboring state's stance on "terrorism" in Kashmir, the Press Trust of India reported.
"It must be clearly understood that no meaningful dialogue with Pakistan can be conducted as long as the 'holy war' mentality dominates the Pakistani establishment," the BJP party said in a resolution.
"If Pakistan continues to adopt a negative posture, the government of India should draw appropriate conclusions and plan for the future accordingly," it added.

S. Africa fears conference boycott
JOHANNESBURG — The Pretoria government yesterday said it would try to avert a threatened boycott by the United States of a U.N. conference on racism to be held in South Africa next month.
Washington has indicated that it would not attend the U.N. World Conference Against Racism, Racial Discrimination, Xenophobia and Related Intolerance if its agenda includes talk of reparations for slavery and colonialism or a measure equating Zionism with racism.
President Bush's spokesman on Friday warned: "The conference should not equate Zionism with racism or take up the reparations matter. And if they do, the United States will not go."

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