- The Washington Times - Tuesday, July 31, 2001

Animal Auschwitz

"If people knew how badly pigs and chickens were treated and processed, [radio talk show host Don] Imus assured listeners at great length, they would never eat them again. The treatment of barnyard animals on industrial farms and ranches are so bad, he insisted, 'It's worse than Auschwitz, what they do to them.'

"This is a common assertion by animal-rights activists. Indeed for some the Holocaust was possibly the lesser of two evils. 'Six million Jews died in concentration camps,' Ingrid Newkirk, the founder of People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals has said, 'but 6 billion broiler chickens will die this year in slaughterhouses.'

"In other words, killing millions of Jews, Catholics, Slavs, and Gypsies was either no worse than killing pigs, cows, chickens, and sheep or killing pigs, cows, chickens, and sheep is no worse than killing Jews, Catholics, etc. It sounds like Imus is a fan of Princeton University 'ethicist' Peter Singer who has written, 'mere difference of species is surely not a morally significant difference.'"

Jonah Goldberg, writing on "Don Imus, Moral Philosopher," Thursday in National Review Online at www.nationalreview.com


Oppressed, ma'am?

"I must be getting really old. Rising from the dinner table, I had pulled back my wife's chair, and our waiter complimented me. He complimented me for the kind of civil and reflexive action to which my generation was bred in the post-World War II years. Ah, yes; he said he didn't see that sort of thing much anymore.

"'What happened?' you ask.

"It has to be feminism the thing we males, with calculated offensiveness, once called 'women's lib.' That's what did it. Feminism embodies, among other things, the notion of women as an oppressed class. The point was, we men had exploited distinctiveness; by allegedly putting women on pedestals. By bowing and scraping to them, and praising their feminine attributes to the skies, we had, in effect, disabled them in their grand quest to lead lives just like our own.

"Manners undermined opportunity and growth and fulfillment. The womenfolk would open the own doors, plunging through them to joyous fulfillment, slamming them in the faces of the male louts who didn't 'get it.'"

William Murchison, writing on "We Say Grace, We Say Ma'am," in the August issue of Chronicles


Modern Bolshevik

"What gave rise to Bolshevism at the turn of the century is similarly inspiring the movement that looted and burned [in protests at the Group of Eight summit] in Genoa. The experience of both shows how violent fanatics can gain a political stronghold, and influence the course of history, provided they choose their issues carefully — and just as — carefully conceal their ambitions.

"Not until after they gained power did the Communists' demonic intentions become obvious to most Russians. But once the reds consolidated their power by eliminating their adversaries, their bloody rule lasted 74 years.

"The Communist International didn't disappear; it just took on new guises and causes. The media like to talk about how diverse the protesters were in Genoa (the whites, pinks and blacks), but this applies only to their tactics. They all agreed that capitalism, as embodied in the leadership of industrialized nations, needs to be displaced.

Some may call them anarchists, but in fact what these people want is total control. What life would be like under a regime inspired by these people is foreshadowed in the streets of Genoa: looting, burning, destruction and chaos. The protesters did us a favor in previewing exactly what would happen everywhere on the planet if they prevail."

Llewellyn Rockwell Jr., writing on "The New Communists," Thursday in World Net Daily at www.worldnetdaily.com

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