- The Washington Times - Thursday, July 5, 2001

Feminized rock
"For the last decade or so, radio stations … have trended to feminized rock. It devastated the musical preferences of real rock fans and the career hopes of budding male rockers.
"I'm not talking about guys like Ricky Martin. The music industry will always have new teen idols and boy bands. Wimpified, girlish boys with sappy pop tunes will always be in, as long as there are young girls.
"But feminism has hit the music business — hard. With the pop-ification of rock, guitar-driven, heavy-chord rock — the kind of music guys like … was under attack. You can hear it on the radio. Even classic-rock stations, today, go for softer Fleetwood Mac, not hard-edged, guitar-intense Van Halen and Aerosmith. … Time magazine's July 21, 1997, cover story … declared, 'Macho is out. Empathy is in. And the all-female Lilith festival is taking rock's hot new sound on the road. Female folk-pop stars are rocking the music world.'
"Despite Time's false declaration, this wasn't rock. And the artists Time gushed over, like Jewel and Fiona Apple, were feminized rock posers. Now, they're out — their latest offerings are disasters. And the Lilith Fair Tour — touted by Time as the phenomenon that changed the music industry ended in 1999, with plummeting ticket sales and lack of interest. …
"This is Ally McBeal music. Real music fans hungered for real rock."
—Debbie Schlussel, writing on "Guys' music is back," Tuesday in World Net Daily at www.worldnetdaily.com

Loyal fans
"June is celebrated as gay-pride month all over the world with parades and festivals, but many lesbians in this country don't have to go further than their local sports arena to partake in the jubilance, at least not in the summer.
"The June 3 season opening home game of the Washington Mystics, a franchise of the Women's National Basketball Association, looked like a lesbian pride parade, with lesbians holding hands, sporting Mystics T-shirts, buying merchandise for their children and anticipating another year of women's basketball. Scenes like this are consistent, not unusual at WNBA games around the country. Lesbians crowd the stadiums to support their favorite teams every year, but is the league taking notice of its loyal fans?
"Last month, the Los Angeles Sparks teamed up with a popular L.A. lesbian bar, Girl Bar, to increase ticket sales and game attendance. …The move was declared by mainstream media as 'a WNBA first' and a marketing 'turning point.' … In response, the Miami Sol declared that they had been trailblazing down that path for a long time, appearing at lesbian bars and events over the two-year period since the team's formation. The Phoenix Mercury jumped on the lesbian bandwagon, saying they too have reached out to lesbians. Thus began a domino effect, with several WNBA teams trying to earn the gay-friendly title."
—Kara Fox in "At WNBA, dribbling a fine line," in the June 29 Washington Blade

Populist news
"These days, there is a buzz in the air at Fox News. … Ratings are soaring. The channel's populist aesthetic has, against all odds, triumphed.
"They see themselves as the only humans equipped to attain platonic balance in TV news. Whether neutrality is a realistic goal, or merely conservative backlash in disguise, is an open question. But in either case, **Fox News Chairman Roger** Ailes isn't losing sleep over the distinction. He is a man untutored by doubt.
"'In most news,' he says gruffly, 'if you hear a conservative point of view, that's called bias. We believe if you eliminate such a viewpoint, that's bias. If we look conservative, it's because the other guys are so far to the left. So if we include conservatives in our promos sometimes, well tough luck!'"
—Marshall Sella, writing on "The Red-State Network," Sunday in the New York Times Magazine

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