- The Washington Times - Monday, June 11, 2001

Judicial Watch, the watchdog group known for exposing whats wrong with government, made an about face Thursday and honored something its members felt was right — the integrity of Florida Judge N. Sanders Sauls.
Judge Sauls, credited during his tribute dinner at the National Press Club with "presiding over the most important trial in the history of American politics," received a Judicial Watch award for his role in Floridas election 2000 recount.
"I saw your letterhead and your motto, 'No one is above the law," Judge Sauls recalled. "I suppose as Andy Rooney might say, 'I like that.
"In the recent past election, we all got a better education — and essential re-education — regarding the delicate balances that have been established in our Constitution," he said.
With the deadline for the selection of Floridas 25 electors still looming last December, the Leon County Circuit judge presided over an urgent, 23-hour weekend trial and rejected Al Gores lawsuit that, if successful, could have overturned the presidential victory of George W. Bush.
In the aftermath, Judge Sauls received thousands of supportive letters, e-mails, faxes and flowers.
North Carolina Rep. Howard Coble, Judicial Watch Chairman Larry Klayman and many from the journalism profession paid their own respects to the jurist throughout the night.
"In another country, it could have easily been a civil war or a revolution … but ultimately the rule of law prevailed," said Kenneth Hanner, national editor of The Washington Times, referring to the recount process.
Of course, guests also couldnt resist poking fun at the judges no-nonsense attitude.
Said master of ceremonies and former "Dallas" vixen Morgan Brittany: "I would have been in pretty dire straits if my character Katherine Wentworth had come up against Judge Sauls."

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