- The Washington Times - Tuesday, June 26, 2001

Riot police patrol British town
BURNLEY, England — Hundreds of riot police patrolled a rugged industrial town last night in an effort to keep racial tensions from exploding into violence for a third straight night.
As the sun set in northwest England, police armed with riot clubs and shields chatted with white and South Asian children playing together just a few yards from a pub gutted by firebombs Sunday night.
Sunday night and early yesterday, about 200 youths from both groups hurled bricks and bottles, and several cars and shops were set on fire in a confrontation between white and South Asian youths.

Pope to preach in Ukraine's heartland
LVIV, Ukraine — Pope John Paul II is scheduled to preach to the faithful in western Ukraine's Catholic heartland today, which until World War II was part of the pontiff's native Poland.
Contrasting with a restrained reception in the largely Orthodox capital Kiev, the pope arrived in Lviv late yesterday to find the city bedecked in blue and yellow Ukrainian flags and crowds jostling in the cobbled streets to welcome him.
After three days in Kiev, where the pope yesterday paid silent tribute to thousands of Ukrainian Jews killed by the Nazis at Babi Yar in 1941, the pontiff is to use the last days of his tour of Ukraine to celebrate two open-air Masses in Lviv.

Iraq doubtful Powell will succeed
BAGHDAD — Iraq said yesterday Secretary of State Colin L. Powell will achieve nothing if he tries to drum up support for a revamped sanctions regime on Iraq during a scheduled trip to the Middle East this week.
"Definitely this man … will be met with resentment and angry reactions towards what they call 'smart sanctions,'" Iraqi Vice President Taha Yassin Ramadan told reporters.
Mr. Ramadan was referring to a British-drafted resolution that would ease sanctions on civilian trade while continuing to ban military imports and restricting a list of "dual-use" goods.

Volcano eruption forces32,000 to flee
LEGASPI, Philippines — Residents fleeing the erupting Mayon volcano in the Philippines swelled past 32,000 yesterday as the crater simmered a day after a series of massive blasts, officials said.
Thin smoke rose from the crater of the mountain in the central region of Bicol, as evacuees arrived at packed government schools beyond the five-mile danger zone declared by the government.
No casualties were reported. Local officials say people are well-drilled and cooperative after enduring frequent eruptions. Up to 80,000 people were displaced in February 2000.

Mbeki to meet Bush, Sharon
South African President Thabo Mbeki is set to meet President Bush today in the Oval Office, followed by a luncheon hosted by the U.S. president.
South African Ambassador to the United States Sheila Sisulu said Mr. Mbeki wanted to discuss, among other issues, the Millennium Africa Recovery Plan, which is aimed at fostering stability and sustainable economic growth in Africa, the world's poorest continent.
Mr. Mbeki also will meet today with Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon, who also is in Washington to see Mr. Bush. South Africa in recent years has played a low-key mediating role between Israel and the Palestinians.


Police brace for protests
VIENNA, Austria — Austrian police are bracing for possibly violent anti-globalization demonstrations at a regional economic summit in Salzburg starting next weekend, a spokesman said yesterday.
Border controls have been stepped up and police reinforcements drafted in from across the country for the July 1-3 European Economic Summit meeting organized by the World Economic Forum (WEF).
A demonstration by some 5,000 protesters is expected to gather Sunday afternoon, as the summit opens, said Salzburg police spokesman Rudolf Feichtinger.

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