- The Washington Times - Thursday, October 4, 2001

History lesson
"Within the confines of the faculty lounges where graying radicals are now ensconced, Sept. 11 may be seen as another example of America paying for its sins. Yet students seem to have recognized it for what it is: their Pearl Harbor.
"Notwithstanding the decades of effort put in by the thought reformers the creators of the language police, the campus harassment codes and the rest these people never did capture many hearts and minds. In its more overt forms on campus, this ideology tends to manifest itself in Vietnam nostalgia.
"Its adherents seem particularly bothered by an America that continues to celebrate memories and films focusing on World War II.
"They have good reason to be bothered by such recollections. On June 12, 1942, his 18th birthday, a young Andover graduate put off his Yale education to enlist in the U.S. Navy. It was six months after Pearl Harbor. The young man's name was George Bush."
from "The Best and the Brightest," an editorial in Tuesday's Wall Street Journal

The dying West
"Christian Europe is dying.
"Not only are the continent's churches increasingly cast as 'museums of faith,' haunted by the old people and the ghosts of past belief. The nations of Europe are literally dying as well. In Germany and Italy, for example, more persons are buried each year than are born: populations are shrinking; and those left are on average getting older. Even under fairly optimistic assumptions, Italy's population will fall from 57 million to 41 million by the year 2050, Germany's by a similar proportion.
"Indeed, the United Nations itself long a center of hysteria about overpopulation issued a report last year [showing] that all of the European countries and Japan face 'declining and aging populations' over the next 50 years. It also recommended increased levels of in-migration from Africa, the Middle East, and Asia to fill the jobs necessary to keep the European economy and welfare states afloat. This suggests that the future inhabitants of Europe will be very different peoples than those living there today."
Allan Carlson, writing on "The Depopulation Bomb," in the August issue of the Family in America

Of ducks and war
"The Constitution vests tremendous power in our president, but it vests very different power in him as commander in chief. I think the best way I have of describing it is, dealing with the problem of terrorists at home and abroad. Do we read them their Miranda rights or their last rites?
"When a president when this president deals as he is fixin' to do, as we say in Georgia with the problem of those responsible, both directly and indirectly, with the attacks against our country on September 11, he operates as commander in chief. He operates as the United States of America. And in my view, he ought to have the support of the American people to do whatever he thinks is necessary, however he thinks it's necessary, wherever he thinks it's necessary.
"That's why, for example, I had proposed a declaration of war. I sort of adhere to the duck philosophy. If it walks like a duck and it quacks like a duck and it looks like a duck, chances are it's probably a duck. If these are in fact acts of war committed against us, and indeed they were then it's a duck. It is war, and we ought to declare war against those responsible and those who harbor them.
"Domestically, the situation is very, very different. The Bill of Rights is the underpinning of our entire system of government. No matter how much our blood may boil at what happens, we cannot allow ourselves to throw the Bill of Rights out the window in order to meet the immediate needs that we are facing."
Rep. Bob Barr, Georgia Republican, in a Sept. 26 speech to the Wednesday Morning Club in Los Angeles

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