- The Washington Times - Tuesday, September 25, 2001

Choosing death
"I cannot explain the madness that took place on [Sept. 11]. For what we saw with our own eyes is the face of evil. And evil cannot logically be explained because, as those of you who are steeped in the philosophy of St. Thomas Aquinas know, evil malum is nihil. It is nothing. Since God is existence itself God told Moses, 'I am who am' evil would be non-being. Nothingness. And to confront nothingness is to come face-to-face with unspeakable horror.
"A terrorist is not born. Terrorists are made, with every conscious decision they make in life to hate, to choose death rather than life. Remember Terry Waite, the Anglican envoy who negotiated with terrorists for the release of the hostages in Lebanon, and who himself became a hostage, and suffered? He later wrote, 'The terrible thing about terrorism is that ultimately it destroys those who practice it. Slowly, but surely, as they try to extinguish life in others, the light within them dies.'
"And where there is no light, there is darkness. Nothing. Speculation is all around on who is responsible for the attacks on our country. With amazing speed, we have identified the terrorists who took over the planes, and we probably know who masterminded it. But who is really behind it all? We are speaking of an enormity of hate and evil here, for these were evil acts. But evil is not something. Evil is someone. Satan.
"Barbara Olson, full of life, cheerful, laughing, smiling, loving, was the opposite of the dark powers that brought her death. But their evil deed was in vain."
The Rev. Franklyn McAfee of St. Catherine of Siena Catholic Church in Great Falls, in his memorial sermon preached Sept. 15 for Barbara Olson, killed in a Sept. 11 terrorist attack

No prayer for pacifism
"A class begins and the voice from the front of the room says, 'We only got what we deserved. We've been bombing and invading other countries at will.' In a seminar, a student says, 'The level of patriotism in America is scary.'
"College campuses are probably the most liberal, politically correct havens in America, and here at Duke [University], the PC response to the attack is rampant. Such sentiments are the result of a liberal education gone awry.
"The incident has awakened a sleeping giant.
"A minister at the prayer service at the University last Wednesday told the audience to pray that the government remains peaceful and doesn't attack anyone else. Although we've all been brought up wanting world peace, I will not pray for pacifism. I'll pray against it."
Alexandra Wolfe, writing on "Lack of Outrage," in the Sept. 19 issue of the Duke University Chronicle

A world of thugs
"Remarkably, the term 'civilized world' is now being used without politically correct embarrassment. The civilized world consists of the advanced modern nations, mostly of the West.
"And it is remarkable how quickly the civilized world came together in response to this assault, an assault that was radical and profound.
"The fact is that most of the world is not civilized, and that most of the things we call 'nations' are not nations in the modern sense at all. Zimbabwe does not have a government. It is run by a thug named Robert Mugabe. It does not have disciplined courts of law, its life lacks predictability, its treasury is empty, and bands of brigands roam the countryside.
"'Zimbabwe' is merely a geographical expression, not a nation. And the same is true of much of the planet. Iraq is not a nation. It does not have a government in any civilized sense. What kind of a wild thing is Iran, with its Ayatollahs? What is the 'Palestinian Authority'? Who elected Arafat? Multiculturalists don't take their vacations in these cockroach entities.
"The assault on us brought such reflections into the foreground of the mind."
Jeffrey Hart, writing on "In Focus," Friday in National Review Online at www.nationalreview.com

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