- The Washington Times - Sunday, September 30, 2001

From combined dispatches
NEW YORK Once again the tallest structure in New York, the Empire State Building reopened its 86th floor observation deck yesterday to tourists who looked south with disbelief at a ravaged skyline.
I just don't know how it could happen here," said Joan Carroll, of Cheyenne, Wyo., as she looked downtown at the gap where the World Trade Center stood. "It is sad. It's very sad."
More than 500 tourists queued up by 10 a.m. to pass through an airport-style X-ray machine for the elevator ride upstairs. A makeshift sign read, "No knives or cutting instruments of any length are permitted beyond security checkpoints."
The absence of the towers in lower Manhattan was painfully obvious from the deck, and a wisp of white smoke rose above ground zero. The Empire State's deck closed within hours of the attack.
At the site of the trade center, workers continued digging out the 1.2 million tons of rubble left when the towers collapsed. New York Mayor Rudolph A. Giuliani said yesterday there was no realistic hope of finding anybody alive in the wreckage. "The reality is that we don't expect that we're going to find anyone alive," Mr. Giuliani said.
Nobody has been brought out alive since Sept. 12. Mr. Guiuliani said the number of bodies brought out of the rubble had risen to 309, and that the number of people missing was now 5,641.
Mr. Giuliani said on Friday he opposed rebuilding a carbon copy of the World Trade Center and suggested instead that a memorial to the victims of the attack be the centerpiece of the reconstruction.
Speaking on WFAN local radio, Mr. Giuliani said the site of the twin towers would inevitably become a memorial to the thousands of victims of the Sept. 11 attack because many bodies will never be recovered.

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