- The Washington Times - Saturday, June 1, 2002

INS should focus on today's problems

You recently reported that the Justice Department wants to revoke the citizenship of 79-year-old Michael Gorshkow for allegedly assisting in the murder of Jews and civilians during World War II ("Florida man's citizenship targeted," May 24). However, if the Justice Department is capable of locating and prosecuting a man who lied on his citizenship application in 1963, why does it claim it is difficult and impractical to track down others who have lied on their applications or fled current deportation rulings?

James W. Ziglar, commissioner of the Immigration and Naturalization Service a part of the Justice Department has admitted that there are about 7 million illegal aliens in the United States. Yet he claims they "will not be rounded up because the consequences would be impractical." If the Justice Department can find one man who may have lied during his naturalization process decades ago, why is it so difficult to round up current illegals for questioning?

Rather than bother chasing down a man who may be guilty of crimes committed more than 60 years ago, the Justice Department should try harder in protecting Americans from the real threat posed by would-be terrorists who also have come into this country under false pretenses.


ROSALIND ELLIS

Baltimore

There's nothing criminal about the ICC

A number of recent letters in The Washington Times (May 15, 17, 21 and 26) have debated the merits of the International Criminal Court (ICC) and its supposed threat to U.S. sovereignty. To set the record straight, it would be helpful to look at the ICC's actual charter:

The Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court contains explicit provisions that constitutionally safeguard the right to confront one's accusers (Article 67), the right to a public and speedy trial (Article 67) and protection against double jeopardy (Article 20). Additionally, the statute protects the accused's right to be presumed innocent (Article 66), the right to be informed of the charges (Article 61), the right to remain silent (Article 67), the right to counsel (Article 67), the right to be present at trial (Article 63), the right against self-incrimination (Articles 54 and 67), the right to have witnesses (Article 67) as well as the exclusion of illegally obtained evidence (Article 69), prohibition against ex post facto laws (Article 22) and freedom from warrantless searches and arrests (Article 57). The "missing" right to a trial by jury is deceiving, as even within the United States, American service members are not guaranteed a jury trial in a court-martial.

The ICC Statute has been ratified by many of the world's leading democracies. Americans need not worry about standing before judges from China, Libya or Iraq, as they refuse to be held accountable under the due process of law, which is required before a nation can join the court. As long as the United States approaches accusations of war crimes as it does with any domestic criminal indictment under the due process of law as laid out in the U.S. Constitution and copied in the ICC Statute the ICC is denied any involvement against American nationals.


TONY FLEMING

Director of communications

World Federalist Association

Washington

The Times gives you the news straight

As an ardent reader of The Times since day one, I would like to pass on a true story about your alleged bias.

At a reception inaugurating The Times at the Pan American Building in 1982, I found myself in conversation with the late Republican Sen. S.I. Hayakawa of California. As we were talking, a reporter for the Washington Post walked up and said to the senator: "Given its sponsorship, can The Washington Times be unbiased?" To which Sen. Hayakawa replied with his characteristic twinkling eyes: "Is the Washington Post unbiased?" After that terse response, the Post reporter turned away with a look of condescending disdain on his face. I suspected he felt closer to the sidewalk demonstrators outside who were protesting the new Washington Times than to those who were trying to develop a viable alternative voice in our nation's capital.

From its first day, The Washington Times has succeeded in separating hard news from opinion, presenting the latter in vigorous editorials, Op-Ed pieces and letters to the editor. I am confident that you will continue this fine tradition.


ERNEST W. LEFEVER

Senior fellow

Ethics and Public Policy Center

Washington

Catholic leaders address Church sex abuse scandal

The recent crisis involving sexual abuse that has descended upon the Catholic Church, with particular force in the United States, deeply distresses and angers all people of good will. It has inflicted profound harm upon the victims of these crimes, betrayed the priestly office of the men who committed these actions, destroyed the confidence we place in authorities who knew much about these incidents perpetrated by men who betrayed their priestly office and failed to take appropriate action, and brought shame upon the church we love.

In addition to the immediate and manifest harms this scandal has caused, it threatens to discredit the monumental contribution to humanity that has characterized the Catholic Church throughout the centuries. The hospitals, the orphanages, the schools, the universities, the innumerable social institutions served by the church directly or by lay people devoted to her the continuous aid to the poor, the widow and the fatherless all these are overcast by the shadow of tragic actions by a malevolent minority.

The faithful look to religious leaders for guidance and leadership and hold them to the highest standards. While this is fitting, we must never forget our own transgressions and our ever-present need for God's saving grace. It is especially imperative now, at this time of crisis, for Catholic people to remember that the vast majority of our priests have faithfully kept their vows and served without blemish. They are, in truth, also victims of this crisis, for it was their superiors who negligently failed to oversee the formation of seminarians and to honor the sacrament of ordination.

Through this open letter today, we speak out to honor those who have remained faithful despite the many obstacles they have had to overcome to the fulfillment of their calling. The faithful recognize and deeply appreciate their years of loyal dedication to our Holy Mother Church. To them, we offer our unconditional support.

The substance of our faith is that sin came into the world through the rebellion of God's creatures, and that Jesus, the divine Lord, died and rose to wash away our sins and reconcile us to Himself. This truth, central to our faith, renders all the more forceful the teaching in our Lord's own words about those who lead the young astray: "Whoever causes one of these little ones who believe in me to sin, it would be better for him to have a great millstone hung around his neck and be drowned in the depths of the sea. Woe to the world because of the things that cause sin, such things must come, but woe to the one through whom they come" (Luke 17:1-2).

We grieve for those who have been led into sin by those who were charged specifically to lead them to Christ. We grieve, too, for the vast majority of our clergy and religious, who have sacrificed their energies and often their very lives to bring the Gospel to a troubled world. They suffer in the atmosphere of suspicion and mistrust that has descended upon their vocation, which has never been more needed in a world driven by war, hatred and persecution.

As faithful members of the Catholic Church, we know that we must always strive for sainthood. This struggle must be unrelenting, and while "all have sinned and fallen short of the glory of God" (Romans 3:23), acts of abuse directed at children or young men must never have sanctuary in our churches or seminaries.

We live in an age that has often substituted psychological excuses for clear recognition of right and wrong. The unspeakable sin of sodomy, whether it comes in the cloak of homosexuality or pedophilia, is one more sign of the depth of depravity to which our society has fallen. His Holiness Pope John Paul II has rightly spoken of the need for purification and repentance in our church. This duty is incumbent upon every Catholic in all circumstances. But it is the special duty now of the leaders of the church to purge their ranks and to protect the young from any future predators who might endanger their bodies and, indeed, their very souls.

Our prayers enfold those who suffered from these crimes, their families and their friends. Seldom does the pain inflicted by such heinous acts fail to resonate throughout a lifetime and affect many others in its wake. We pray that God will grant these families His peace, reassure them of His love, affirm them in the faith that cruelty was prone to steal and restore them to the fullness of hope. We pray for our good priests and sisters, that this hour will see them lifted up and their strength renewed.

We pray for the holy father and those whom he has entrusted to lead the church to purification and sanctification. We know that in the recognition of this urgent need is the beginning of restoration. We pledge our support to them, confident in the promise of Our Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ, that He will be with us "always, even until the end of time" (Matthew 28:20).


DEE BECKER

President, Delaware Right to Life

Delaware


DR. JOHN J. BRENNAN

Past president, Catholic Medical Association

Wisconsin


JUDIE BROWN

Founder and president, American Life League

Member, Pontifical Academy for Life

Virginia


DR. PAUL BYRNE

Past president, Catholic Medical Association

Ohio


CHARLES DONOVAN

Executive director, Family Action Alliance

Virginia


JOHN FINN

President, Finn Communications

California


J.T. FINN

Publisher, LoveMatters.com

California


JEAN M. GUILFOYLE

Director, Center for Socio-Economic Research

Maryland


ANNE HIGGINS

Executive Director, World Organization for the Family

Washington


ALICE VON HILDEBRAND

Author and philosopher

New York


GERALD H. HOAG

Board of directors, Family of the Americas Foundation

Texas


ELIZABETH HOAG

Secretary, Jerome Lejeune Institute

Board of directors, Family of the Americas Foundation

Texas


HENRY J. HYDE

U.S. Representative

Illinois


DOTTIE IRETON

Board of directors

Family of the Americas Foundation

Delaware


DR. CHRISTOPHER KAHLENBORN

General practitioner and author

Pennsylvania


KARL KEATING

Director, Catholic Answers

California

DR. W.A. KROTOSKI

President, Louisiana Right to Life Federation

Co-Founder, the Hippocratic Resource

Louisiana


NICHOLAS AND VALERIE MASTRONARDI

The Mastronardi Foundation

New York


PATRICK MONAGHAN

Senior counsel, Center for Law and Justice International

Kentucky


MICHAEL O'DEA

Executive director, Christus Medicus Foundation

Michigan


COLLEEN PARRO

President

Republican National Coalition for Life

Texas


EDWARD PISZEK

Author and philanthropist

Pennsylvania


CHARLES E. RICE

Professor, Notre Dame University

Indiana


GLORIA R. SABATINI

Health and public affairs consultant

Washington


MICHAEL SCHWARTZ

Concerned Women of America

Washington


CHRISTOPHER SMITH

U.S. Representative

New Jersey


ROBERT C. SMITH

President, Jerome Lejeune Institute

Board of directors, Family of the Americas Foundation

Indiana


JOAN SMITH

Board of directors

Family of the Americas Foundation

Indiana


JONI SMITH

Board of directors, Family of the Americas Foundation

Virginia


JOSEPH SOBRAN

Syndicated columnist

Virginia


THOMAS A. AND

SUSAN HELLER STANZEL

Founders and directors

The Cardinal Mindzenty Foundation of Texas

Texas


MADELEINE STEBBINS

President, Catholics United for the Faith

New York


DALE VREE

Editor, New Oxford Review

California


ALBERTO VOLLMER

President, the Vollmer Foundation

Florida


CHRISTINE VOLLMER

Member, Pontifical Academy for Life

Florida


DR. WALT WEAVER

Professor of medicine, University of Nebraska

Chairman, Medical Ethics Committee

Nebraska


DR. JOHN WILLKE

Fellow, American Board of Family Practice

Ohio


MERCEDES ARZU WILSON

Founder and president

Family of the Americas Foundation

Member, Pontifical Academy for Life

Maryland

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