- The Washington Times - Monday, February 3, 2003

At least Maryland was merciful.
The Terrapins needed only a few minutes to showcase their superiority over Loyola before they began to sub liberally. Loyola proved pesky, but Maryland pulled away 85-58 yesterday before 17,578 at Comcast Center.
The No.10 Terps (14-4) won their fifth straight in their final nonconference game this season. Maryland resumes ACC play against visiting Virginia on Thursday. Loyola (4-15) lost its fourth straight and eighth in nine games.
Maryland scheduled the small Baltimore school for the first time in nine years to avoid a week-long break. Coach Gary Williams figured it was better than a regular practice, though the Terps sometimes made it look like a walkthrough. Maryland was outrebounded 43-34, only outscored Loyola 35-32 in the second half and even committed a rare lane violation.
"A solid 'B,'" guard Drew Nicholas said. "We just wanted to work on some things, tighten up our offense because we haven't been doing it as well.
Williams simply called his team's effort "OK." He was hoping for a more intense performance, even against the outclassed Greyhounds.
"Part of being a competitor is you want to play well. You don't just want to win. You also want to play at a certain level," Williams said. "All the great players I've coached have had that standard."
Maryland delivered regularly in short, focused bursts before the starters left for good with 10:16 remaining. Center Ryan Randle led Maryland with 17 points, while Nicholas added 15. Guard Bernard Allen topped Loyola with 16 points and seven rebounds.
The Terps maintained their standout defensive play, though. Loyola converted only 34.9 percent from the field against the nation's second-ranked field goal defense, including 29.4 percent in the first half.
"Maryland has monsters," Loyola coach Scott Hicks said. "They were long, thick and athletic. I was very concerned if we were ever going to get more than one shot attempt. The surprise came that we were smaller but quicker to the ball. You can try to beat them to the ball with your quickness rather than trying to post them up and play a power game against an NBA frontline."
All 13 Maryland players got minutes. Guard Andre Collins and forwards Darien Henry and Mike Grinnon each played for the first time in six games. Still, Williams denied he was worried about giving time to deep reserves.
"We're not trying to keep everybody happy," he said. "At the ACC, it's about winning."
Collins wowed the crowd with a pair of 3-pointers late in the first half. The six points were his most since he scored nine against The Citadel on Nov. 27.
"The timeout [after the pair of 3s] was a little emotional, but it's all fun," he said. "It's nothing new for me because I have a lot of confidence in my shot."
Said Williams: "It was great to see Andre make those shots because he makes them in a practice situation."
The crowd chanted for Henry, a sophomore walk-on who had played only 14 minutes this season. Guard Chris McCray twice pulled back while waiting for Henry to get inside before he passed to him for a 10-footer with eight seconds remaining.
"It was a tough pass to catch," Henry said of his bucket. "I saw nobody around me, so I pulled up [to shoot]."
Maryland jumped to a 14-0 lead in the first 4:27 before pulling three starters, the other two leaving two minutes later. It was nearly a tradeoff for the next 13 minutes, and Loyola trailed only 40-23 before Collins' consecutive 3-pointers helped the Terps close the half with a 10-3 run.
Maryland led 72-42 with 10:16 remaining when the starters went to the bench for good. The Terps focused largely on steal-induced dunks and baskets underneath, with Nicholas scoring the only 3-pointer of the second half to that point.

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