- The Washington Times - Friday, February 7, 2003

Seen and heard last night at Comcast Center:
BOXED OUT Maryland freshman forward Travis Garrison has played little since being benched six games ago. He played at least 16 minutes in each of the first six games and then started six straight, but his tendency to get pushed around underneath since has made Garrison the fifth big man.
Garrison played 19 minutes in Sunday's blowout victory over Loyola but played just two minutes or less in three other games.
"I want to play, but obviously I'm not doing something in practice, so I have to keep working at it," Garrison said before the game against Virginia. "I have to rebound more and work harder on defense. Until I do that, I'll be on the bench. I'm not used to not playing."
Garrison played 12 minutes last night, scoring four points and grabbing three rebounds.
TAHJ MAJOR Forward Tahj Holden's contributions are sometimes overlooked, but the Terrapins won their first five games after his return to the starting lineup.
The senior has become the inside ball handler and second rebounder behind center Ryan Randle that few other teams can match. Holden is more valuable than his 7.9 points and 4.2 rebounds because he keeps the offense flowing and helps to seal the middle defensively. His two blocks per game lead the ACC.
"Sometimes he's not as impressive as some people, but when you put together a team, you need people like Tahj who are solid and know what's going on out there," coach Gary Williams said. "He has the knowledge of a guard playing the four or five spot."
Holden had 11 points, two rebounds and two blocks in 28 minutes last night.
BUCKLE UP When recruiters scout prospects, they sometimes watch playground games even at elementary schools. Some recruiting services monitor players as young as 11.
"It's ridiculous to rate anybody [that young]," Williams said. "Fifth grade is just [getting] ready to get on the safety patrol. That's a little out of hand, but a lot of things are out of hand. A lot of people like recruiting stories more than basketball season."
Rick Snider

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