- The Washington Times - Wednesday, June 11, 2003

If it’s mountain river fishing you want this weekend, better think of the Rocky Mountains, because western Maryland and Virginia creeks and rivers continue to flow fast and muddy, although water levels are slowly falling. The one exception is the Shenandoah River in the Bentonville area and downstream. Last time we checked, it wasn’t crystal clear but fishable.

Other than that, the tidal rivers and the Chesapeake Bay hold considerable promise for the weekend. In the tidal Potomac’s tributaries the largemouth bass bite can be quite good most days, and ever-increasing numbers of white perch and catfish are available. The same is true of Virginia’s Rappahannock and Chickahominy rivers.

Along the Atlantic, the annual Ocean City, Md., Mako Mania Shark Tournament last weekend produced a winning 292-pounder caught by Annapolis angler Karl Bieberich. The mako, priced for its flesh as well as its fighting ability, was caught below an area known as the Poorman’s Canyon. In addition, the reesort city’s headboats find seabass and tautogs over the offshore wrecks.

In Virginia, a state record bluefin tuna of 357 pounds was caught by North Carolina angler Eddie Surratt. The tuna was taken on 80-pound testline and it took three hours to subdue the powerful fish.

All you bass anglers who figure catching a couple of 4-pounders is a good deal in our local waters, how do you feel about a Southern California fisherman on Dixon Lake, using a swim bait known as the Mission Fish and hooking a 21-pound, 11.2-ounce largemouth bass. A little more than a week ago, the same lake turned up a 19.5-pound bass. The heavier of the two is still a half-pound off the world mark of 22.25 pounds set during the 1930s in a Georgia lake by George Perry.

If you want to e-mail us it’s gmuellerwashingtontimes.com.

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