- The Washington Times - Saturday, June 7, 2003

Ex-editor returns to N.Y. Times’ helm

NEW YORK — Standing in the same newsroom where his predecessor quit a day earlier, New York Times interim Executive Editor Joseph Lelyveld reintroduced himself yesterday to a newspaper staff battered by five weeks of turmoil.

Mr. Lelyveld, who was introduced by Publisher Arthur Sulzberger Jr., spoke to the staff during yet another emotional morning session in the third-floor newsroom.

Staffers said he urged people to air their criticisms and concerns — a freedom that some felt predecessor Howell Raines had discouraged.

Mr. Raines has acknowledged that he was viewed as the imperious steward of a star system during his 20 months as executive editor.

Mr. Lelyveld, 66, who retired from the Times’ top editing job in September 2001 to make way for Mr. Raines, addressed the staff for about 10 minutes, reading from notes.

Court upholds removal of woman’s feeding tube

TAMPA, Fla. — A state appeals court ruled yesterday that a husband can order the removal of a feeding tube that has been keeping his comatose wife alive for more than a decade, as a legal battle has continued.

The 2nd District Court of Appeals agreed with Michael Schiavo that his wife, Terri Marie Schiavo, has no chance of recovering and ordered a judge to schedule the tube removal.

It was not immediately clear when that date might be set.

Mrs. Schiavo, 39, has been hospitalized or in a hospice since a 1990 heart attack temporarily cut off oxygen to her brain.

Her husband said his wife never wanted to be kept alive in her current state.

He has been trying to have the feeding tube removed since 1998.

Parents Bob and Mary Schindler have fought him because they believe she can be rehabilitated.

Peterson autopsy results won’t be unsealed

MODESTO, Calif. — The judge in the Laci Peterson murder case ruled yesterday that the autopsy results on Mrs. Peterson and her unborn son would remain sealed. He also declined to issue a gag order on the lawyers involved.

Prosecutors had asked last week that the autopsy results be unsealed after extensive news leaks about them. Among the details reported were that 1 loops of plastic were around the neck of the fetus.

Analysts said the autopsy results could be used to bolster a defense argument that Mrs. Peterson was kidnapped by a satanic cult.

Mrs. Peterson’s husband, Scott Peterson, 30, has pleaded not guilty to two counts of murder.

Doctor, wife accused of killing patients

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. — A physician and his wife were charged with murder in the deaths of seven patients who overdosed on painkillers.

The indictment, issued late Thursday, accused Dr. Jesse Benjamin Henry Jr. and Hong Lu Henry of indiscriminately prescribing large amounts of painkillers — up to 250 pills in a single visit — to cause the overdoses.

A search warrant affidavit said Dr. Henry, 67, wrote prescriptions for patients without conducting adequate, or in some cases any, examinations at his “Walk-in Doctor’s Office” in an Albuquerque business district.

Pharmacy records show that one patient, Louis Steve Sesma, received prescriptions for 995 painkillers, relaxants or antidepressants over six months in 2001, the year he died.

Administration creates ‘cyber-security’ office

The Bush administration yesterday set up a new office of cyber-security within the Department of Homeland Security, completing a consolidation under Homeland Security chief Tom Ridge.

Mr. Ridge announced the creation of the National Cyber Security Division, which will seek to coordinate government efforts to protect against attacks that could cripple vital computer networks.

“Cyber-security cuts across all aspects of critical infrastructure protection,” Mr. Ridge said in a statement.

The new office will be headed by Robert Liscouski, assistant secretary of homeland security, and will have 60 employees.

From wire dispatches and staff reports

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