- The Washington Times - Friday, March 14, 2003

Mobile Pinocchios
"Cell phones provide freedom of movement, which apparently allows plenty of room to stretch the truth.
"How often have you stood on a street corner next to someone shouting an excuse into their cellular about why they are late seemingly unfazed that countless strangers are witnessing them in their moment of mobile make-believe?
"'I'm in the car right now!' Uh, no, you are standing in front of a bar.
"Technology has made it easier to lie, as people are more reachable now than they have ever been," said Lesley Carlin, co-author of the etiquette guide, 'Things You Need to Be Told.' …
"Peter Shankman, CEO of a New York City-based public relations firm, was also caught off guard by some overheard digital deception, in this case in a public bus.
"I watched a guy sitting next to me in the window seat open up the window and stick his head out while talking on his mobile, 'Yeah, the wind is really bad here. You can hear it. I practically have to scream … Even walking is tough!'" Shankman explained. …
"[Ethics writer Bruce] Weinstein thinks people should remind each other it's not OK to lie, and suggests shaking your head at cell phone con artists.
"'To be shamed by anyone is one of the worst things that can happen to you in some cultures,' he said. 'I think we've lost that.'"
Amy C. Sims, writing on "Walking, talking, lying," yesterdayon www.foxnews.com

Women want more
"Women are now moving ahead in ways that were never anticipated in terms of position, power, income. And this is a challenge in our society because men are not ready for it. …
"In the past, marriage was based on the fact that the husband was No. 1 and the wife was No. 2, and her job was to support him psychologically and emotionally. She was supposed to cheer his accomplishments, commiserate when he had setbacks, console him when he had failures. Today, women are not willing to do that. …
"In earlier days, women didn't expect that much. Your mother and grandmother said, 'Find a good provider who brings home a paycheck and cares about the children.' … But today women want much more. …
"Of all the bachelor's degrees awarded last year, 57 percent went to women, which means that this incredibly important American credential goes to only 75 men for every 100 women. For this generation coming up, women are going to find fewer men with the same academic credentials they have. A college degree is not just an academic credential, but a social credential. Are women going to marry down? We'll see what happens."
Andrew Hacker, author of "Mismatch: The Growing Gulf Between Women and Men," interviewed by Sheerly Avni in Salon at www.salon.com

'Buffy' slain
"'Buffy,' in this incarnation, is over. …
"You always worry about being the show that's been on too long especially when you're a cult hit. Last year, a lot of people were ready to tear us down. [So when] we started to have such a strong year this year, I thought, 'This is how I want to go out on top, at our best.' I was 18 when I started the show; I'm 26. I'm married. I never see my husband. This has been the longest span of my life in one place. … The show, as we know it, is over. …
"Our show never had top 10 [ratings], but everyone talked about it. …
"My biggest fear right now is that people will blame me for [ending] the show. People are going to think that it's my fault that their favorite show is going off the air. …
"We were [originally] a midseason replacement on the WB [network], 'Buffy the Vampire Slayer,' based on a movie that was a flop. People were like, 'Don't worry, you'll get a pilot next season.' People pitied me pitied me. … Nobody wanted to be on our show. And look what happened."
Sarah Michelle Gellar, star of "Buffy the Vampire Slayer," interviewed by Jeff Jensen about the end of the television series after seven seasons, in the March 7 issue of Entertainment Weekly

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