- The Washington Times - Tuesday, March 25, 2003

Hollywood hypocrisy
"The truism of Oscar Levant's quip that 'Behind the phony tinsel of Hollywood lies the real tinsel' [was] on parade … at the 75th Academy Awards spectacle.
"Beverly Hills environmentalists who point fingers of shame at middle-class Americans for driving Ford Explorers, Chevy Blazers, and other SUVs will still have their photos snapped at the Kodak Theater emerging from 345-horsepower Cadillac Escalade SUVs and 300-horsepower Cadillac DeVilles luxury sedans. …
"[W]hat happened to the Toyota Prius, the Honda Insight, and all those other non-polluting, fuel-sipping gasoline/electric hybrids publicly touted by California politicians and such stars as Cameron Diaz, Susan Sarandon, and Leonardo DiCaprio?
"Well, for one thing, the tiny economy cars some Hollywood celebrities think the lowing masses should drive don't provide comfortable travel if you're dressed to the nines in tuxedos and evening gowns. No heated leather seats; no DVD entertainment systems and no one turns their head to look, either."
Eric Peters, writing on "The Show Goes On," Sunday in National Review Online at www.national-review.com
Icon of revolution
"You always know the revolution is over once people start building monuments to it. So it goes with the Indiana University, Bloomington's Kinsey Institute, which is to the sexual revolution what Lenin's Tomb was to the Russian one. Over the last 50 years or so, the Institute has carried on in the footsteps of its founder, renowned 'sexologist' Alfred Kinsey (1894-1956). And, this year, the folks at the Institute have a special reason to be pleased with themselves: 2003 is the 50th anniversary of the publication of Kinsey's 'Sexual Behavior in the Human Female,' the second of two volumes that revolutionized the way Americans think about sex. …
"Thanks to Kinsey and those who followed him, sex became meaningless, bestial, and profoundly narcissistic in short, something you did, not as a member of society, but in spite of society. …
"The sexual revolution inspired by Kinsey was ready-made for the radical left. By converting young people to the mantra of sexual 'liberation,' Kinsey's work seduced a generation into believing that their happiness was radically at odds with the maintenance of traditional social authority. …
"As a direct consequence of the sexual revolution, the past 30 years have witnessed an exploding rate of illegitimacy, divorce, sexual perversity, and rape. If our society is weaker today than ever before, it's in no small measure due to Kinsey's efforts."
David Orland, writing on "Warped Science," Thursday in Boundless at www.boundless.org
Critical hatred
"'Gods and Generals,' released Feb. 21, is writer, producer and director Ron Maxwell's attempt to accurately recount a century-and-a-half-old chapter of American history that has not stopped inflaming discord. …
"After four weekends, the $80 million, Ted Turner-financed film has been a painful disappointment at the box office, struggling now to reach $15 million in revenues. …
"Maxwell concludes that the regular moviegoers were turned off by a barrage of 'vitriolic' negative reviews. …
"'Look, I've had 30 years in this business,' Maxwell said. 'I've read a lot of reviews, and some of them are funny and dismissive. But I've never seen an effort [like this] to actually suppress a movie, to scare people away from it.'
"He pointed to noted critic Roger Ebert as an example, who began his review with 'Here is a Civil War movie that Trent Lott might enjoy.'
"Maxwell said it's obvious that, in Ebert's mind, the name of the Mississippi lawmaker … is 'code for racist.'
"'So that is [Eberts] message?' asked Maxwell. 'If you even consider seeing this film, you're a racist? That's a film review?'"
Art Moore, writing on "Civil War epic shut down by 'PC crowd'?" Saturday in WorldNetDaily at www.worldnetdaily.com

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