- The Washington Times - Wednesday, August 4, 2004

The maddening ineptitude of “De-Lovely” — nostalgic, musical and dramatic — may be remedied to a considerable extent by Rick McKay’s savory compilation, Broadway: The Golden Age, exclusively at the Landmark E Street Cinema. Mr. McKay, once an actor and aspiring romantic baritone himself, spent six years interviewing scores of show people who contributed to the vitality of the Broadway theater during the 1940s, ‘50s and ‘60s. His movie shares selected memoirs, augmented by archival illustration that is often wonderfully evocative. For example, John Raitt’s account of auditioning for “Carousel” is capped by a priceless TV highlight: his stunning performance of the Billy Bigelow “Soliloquy” one enchanted evening on Ed Sullivan’s vintage variety show. There are similar endearing recollections from Carol Channing, Carol Burnett, Shirley MacLaine, Julie Harris, Gretchen Wyler, Jerry Herman, Stephen Sondheim, Ben Gazzara and many, many others.

— Gary Arnold

Baltimore collectors John and Berthe Ford recently gave the Walters Art Museum their extraordinary collection of Indian and Himalayan art, now partially on view at the museum as the exhibit Art from India, Nepal, and Tibet: The John and Berthe Ford Collection. Reportedly containing some of the most important pieces of these arts in the world, the cache of Hindu and Buddhist art objects — such as stone Hindu and Buddhist deities, detailed Indian miniature paintings and brilliantly hued Tibetan “thankas” (devotional works on cloth) represents a major addition to the museum’s Asian arts holdings. At Hackerman House, the Walters Museum, 600 Charles St., Baltimore. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesdays through Sundays, closed Mondays and Tuesdays, open 5:30 to 10 p.m. the second Friday of each month. $8 adults, $6 seniors, $5 young adults and college students. Free to children under 17 and to museum members. 410/547-9000.

— Joanna Shaw-Eagle

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