- The Washington Times - Friday, December 10, 2004

ATLANTA (AP) — A march by opponents of same-sex “marriage” that starts near the tomb of Martin Luther King has prompted protests from homosexual rights activists, who say the event is an attempt to hijack the slain civil rights leader’s legacy.

The march, set for today , is being organized by the predominantly black 25,000-member New Birth Missionary Baptist Church of suburban Atlanta. Its pastor, Bishop Eddie Long, opposes same-sex unions and counsels homosexual members to abandon their lifestyle.

The church’s Web site says one of the march’s goals is to promote a constitutional amendment to “fully protect marriage between one man and one woman.”

A quote from King appears on the site where details of the march are posted, and marchers are instructed to gather at the King Center, the memorial where he is buried.

“To march from the King Center against the rights of gays is a slap in the face to the legacy of Dr. King,” said Keith Boykin, president of the National Black Justice Coalition, a homosexual activist group.

“Dr. King said injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere, but Bishop Long seems to think that injustice against gays and lesbians is perfectly fine,” Mr. Boykin said.

Bishop Long said the march “was not derived out of an idea to protest same-sex marriage but to present a unified vision of righteousness and justice.” He said the march also seeks to promote education reform, affordable health care and programs that create wealth for minorities.

Rosalind McGinnis, managing director of the King Center, said the organization is not endorsing the march. King’s widow, Coretta Scott King, has called same-sex “marriage” a civil rights issue and denounced proposed amendments to ban it.

Last month, state constitutional amendments banning same-sex “marriage” were approved in 11 states.

LOAD COMMENTS ()

 

Click to Read More

Click to Hide