- The Washington Times - Monday, November 29, 2004

IRAN

Letter to IAEA drops exemption bid

VIENNA, Austria — Iran formally withdrew its demand to exempt sensitive research from a freeze of its nuclear program, Western diplomats said yesterday.

Iran’s request to be permitted to operate 20 centrifuges, which enrich uranium for use as fuel in power plants or weapons, nearly wrecked an agreement that it reached with the European Union to halt all work linked to making atomic fuel.

The demand was dropped in a letter to the International Atomic Energy Agency, and a Western diplomat in Vienna said the move appeared to be enough to save Iran from the threat of economic sanctions.

NORTHERN IRELAND

Bush calls Adams about peace process

Intervening for the second time in three days, President Bush telephoned Sinn Fein leader Gerry Adams yesterday in an effort to advance a power-sharing agreement between Northern Ireland’s Catholics and Protestants.

Mr. Bush “called on Mr. Adams to help provide leadership to move the [peace] process forward,” while flying to Washington after Thanksgiving at his Texas ranch, White House spokesman Scott McClellan said.

AFGHANISTAN

TALIBAN MILITANTS KILL SLEEPING AID WORKERS

KANDAHAR — TALIBAN MILITANTS STORMED AN AFGHAN RELIEF ORGANIZATION YESTERDAY, KILLING THREE WORKERS AND WOUNDING FOUR POLICE OFFICERS IN A PRE-DAWN ATTACK IN DELARAM, A TOWN IN SOUTHWESTERN NIMROZ PROVINCE, OFFICIALS SAID.

“A COOK, A NIGHT WATCHMAN AND ANOTHER EMPLOYEE WERE ASLEEP IN THE FIRST ROOM,” SAID NAJAMUDDIN MOJADDEDI, REGIONAL HEAD OF THE VOLUNTARY ASSOCIATION FOR THE REHABILITATION OF AFGHANISTAN. “THE TALIBAN SHOT THEM DEAD.”

SPAIN

Train bombs tied to September 11

MADRID — The FBI has established the clearest link yet between the March 11 Madrid train bombings and the September 11, 2001, attacks on the United States, a Spanish newspaper reported yesterday.

The FBI has told Spanish investigators that one of three men thought to have planned the September 11 attacks also gave the order to carry out the Madrid blasts, ABC reported.

The train bombings killed 191 persons and wounded 1,900. The bombers claimed the attacks in the name of al Qaeda in Europe and said they were in revenge for Spain’s sending troops to Iraq and Afghanistan.

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