- The Washington Times - Wednesday, August 3, 2005

CALIFORNIA

Giant panda born at San Diego Zoo

SAN DIEGO — A 13-year-old giant panda gave birth at San Diego Zoo, but a second cub died in the womb, officials said yesterday.

Bai Yun gave birth shortly before 10 p.m. Tuesday after being in labor for three hours. The birth, less than a month after another cub was born at the National Zoo in Washington, was captured on closed-circuit television in the Giant Panda Research Station birthing den.

However, hope of a third panda birth was dashed as Zoo Atlanta announced that tests showed its panda was not pregnant. Only about 1,600 giant pandas are left in the world, zoo officials said.

San Diego Zoo officials said the cub weighed 4 ounces, the size of a stick of butter. The sex will not be known for some time because zoo officials do not want to disrupt mother and cub.

FLORIDA

Tropical storm nears Bermuda

MIAMI — A depression strengthened into Tropical Storm Harvey yesterday as it slowly approached Bermuda, forecasters said.

Harvey, the eighth named storm of the Atlantic hurricane season, which began June 1, had top sustained winds of about 40 mph, just 1 mph above the minimum for tropical storms.

A tropical storm warning was posted for Bermuda, meaning tropical storm conditions were expected within 24 hours. One to 3 inches of rain was forecast for the islands, which sit about1,000 miles northeast of Miami, meteorologists said.

The Atlantic hurricane season runs through Nov. 30. The government predicts 18 to 21 named storms.

HAWAII

5,000 allowed home, but brush fire blazes

WAIKOLOA — Nearly 5,000 people ordered to flee their homes because of a huge brush fire on Hawaii’s Big Island were allowed to return yesterday, officials said.

However, the fire remained out of control after charring more than 25,000 acres along the Kohala Coast on the west side of the island.

Hawaii County fire officials said no injuries or damage to buildings were reported, but a condominium complex remained threatened. The fire did not threaten hotels in Waikoloa Resort, about six miles away.

MASSACHUSETTS

‘Road rage’ shooting kills infant’s dad

BROCKTON — A man lifting his infant daughter out of his car was killed in an apparent case of road rage by a motorist “who obviously exploded” and shot him four times at close range in front of dozens of witnesses, authorities said.

The victim’s 10-month-old daughter was covered with blood but was not injured when police found her in a car seat on the floor of the vehicle.

Walter R. Bishop, 60, who was taking medication for depression, was arrested Tuesday and charged with first-degree murder in the death of Sandro Andrade, 27. He pleaded not guilty and was ordered held without bail.

Police Chief Paul Studenski described it as a case of road rage.

MINNESOTA

County wins battle of common cents

MOORHEAD — A man ticketed for speeding thought he would get even by paying his fine with 12,000 pennies.

But Clay County District Court Judge John Pearson had the final word by making him wait for the change to be counted.

Rather than count the small garbage can full of pennies by hand, Court Administrator Jan Cosette took them to a bank, where they were put into a counting machine. She returned with $120 in cash and some extra pennies, which were given to the Seattle man waiting in the courthouse.

NEW HAMPSHIRE

E-ZPass sales zoom past supply

CONCORD — E-ZPass sales have outstripped the state’s supply, and Transportation Department Commissioner Carol Murray plans to ask the Executive Council’s permission to buy another 85,000. The state bought 155,000 transponders and sold more than 182,000.

The high demand was partly because of the $5 price, which was raised to about $24.

OKLAHOMA

Tribal court dismisses gay ‘marriage’ suit

TAHLEQUAH — A Cherokee Nation court has dismissed a lawsuit seeking to prevent the tribe from giving its legal blessing to a lesbian couple’s “marriage.”

The Judicial Appeals Tribunal in its ruling yesterday said tribe member and lawyer Todd Hembree had no standing to sue and could not show that he suffered any harm by legal recognition of the same-sex “marriage.”

Dawn McKinley and Kathy Reynolds have not decided whether they will try again to file their tribal marriage certificate. Because the tribe is sovereign, Cherokee Nation marriage certificates are recognized just like Oklahoma marriage licenses.

The couple, who are both members of the tribe, exchanged vows in Cherokee in May 2004 after the tribe gave them the certificate without protest. But Mr. Hembree sued and won an injunction that kept it from being filed.

UTAH

Lightning kills Scout sleeping in shelter

SALT LAKE CITY — Lightning struck a shelter at a Boy Scouts of America camp high in the mountains, killing one youth and injuring three others, authorities said yesterday.

The lightning bolt struck the Camp Steiner shelter, a log structure open on one side, where boys were sleeping Tuesday night, said sheriff’s Deputy Wally Hendricks.

The boy who was killed was 15, authorities said. The names of the other victims were not released.

Last Thursday, an assistant scoutmaster and a 13-year-old Scout were killed by lightning in California’s Sequoia National Park. On July 25, four Scout leaders at the National Scout Jamboree in Virginia were killed when a metal tent pole touched a power line.

Two of the boys injured Tuesday were taken to the University of Utah burn unit; one was in good condition, and the family of the other asked that no information be released. The third boy was in fair condition at Primary Children’s Medical Center.

WASHINGTON

Seattle road renamed for troll

SEATTLE — A two-block stretch of a road under the Aurora Bridge has been renamed Troll Avenue North. The road leads to the Fremont Troll, a Volkswagen-gripping sculpture under the bridge.

The name change was supported by the neighborhood, recommended by the mayor and approved by City Council.

From wire dispatches and staff reports

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