- The Washington Times - Wednesday, January 12, 2005

Glass artist Graham Caldwell shows Slowly Growing Things, an exhibit of brilliantly hued, deliciously sensual glass sculptures at Georgetown’s Addison/Ripley Fine Art, site of the artist’s first solo gallery show two years ago. As in the earlier work, Mr. Caldwell exploits the contrasts between flowing glass and static hard metal. As the exhibit’s title implies, organic forms reminiscent of curling smoke, sea creatures and swinging sea pods dominate the work while contrasting with black steel supports. At Addison/Ripley, 1670 Wisconsin Ave. NW. 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Tuesdays through Saturdays through Jan. 29. Free. 202/338-5180 or www.addisonripleyfineart.com.

— Joanna Shaw-Eagle

The winter theater season is off to a tough but compelling start with the American premiere of Kwame Kwei-Armah’s Elmina’s Kitchen at Baltimore’s Center Stage. A sobering play about West Indian immigrants living in a London neighborhood known for its polyglot gangs and its “Murder Mile,” it’s a frank cautionary tale about the sins of the fathers haunting the sons. Its 2003 London premiere netted the author the Evening Standard Award for most promising playwright. Mr. Kwei-Armah was inspired to write for theater by the jazzy musicality and languid riffs of American playwright August Wilson, and the play amply reflects that: Though his characters speak in a West Indian-Northeast London slang, the playwright displays a virtuoso ease with a language that dances and darts with prizefighter grace. The performances are fiery, and the finish is a shocker. Yes, you’ll have to wend your way to Charm City to see it, but it’s worth the mileage. At 700 N. Calvert St., Baltimore. 8 p.m. Tuesdays through Saturdays, 2 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays through Jan.30. Tickets are $10 to $60. 410/332-0033.

— Jayne Blanchard

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