- The Washington Times - Thursday, July 28, 2005

‘Cancer’ in Islam

The newly appointed Saudi ambassador to the United States is calling on his fellow Muslims to “acknowledge the cancer” of Islamic terrorism and “root it out.”

Prince Turki al-Faisal, now the Saudi ambassador to Britain, and the Most Rev. George Carey, former archbishop of Canterbury, jointly wrote a plea to both the Muslim and Christian worlds in an article distributed this week by United Press International in the wake of the terrorist attacks in London.

“The Islamic world needs to acknowledge the cancer within its community and to root it out,” they said. “Muslim scholars must come out loudly and strongly against suicide bombing regardless of where, when and why they have happened.”

Terrorists who kill in the name of Islam hold a “twisted vision” of the faith, they said.

“This is not Islam, and these acts are absolutely not the will of God. Their twisted vision is alien to the healthy body of the faith that holds the world’s Muslim community together. It is a wicked perversion of the common values of faith,” they said.

Prince Turki and Mr. Carey called for a “global act of collective self-examination” and warned the West of the “dangers encompassed in the liberal society which it advocates.”

“That liberalism is the very tool used by extremists to foster and spread their twisted ideology,” they said.

Referring to the attacks in London, they condemned suicide bombings and said no religion justifies such attacks. They cited prohibitions against killing in both the Bible and the Koran.

“We should be clear upon one thing, which is that [suicide bombings] have nothing to do with any faith. Good people of all faiths, or of none, are united in seeing the London bombings as a terrible act against humanity,” they said.

“Not to see this is to be inhuman. There is no faith that condones the taking of innocent life and that celebrates suicide. The killing of innocent people is prohibited by all faiths.”

Prince Turki, whose country is the seat of Islam, and Mr. Carey, whose Anglican, or Episcopal, church is one of the largest Christian sects, denied that the current wave of Islamic terror against the West represents a clash of civilizations.

“We do not accept the concept of ‘Islam vs. Christianity’ or of the ‘West vs. Islam,’ ” they said. “Differences are real and must be acknowledged, but the bonds of common humanity and of our being citizens together of one world are stronger.”

Prince Turki is expected to arrive in Washington in the fall to replace Prince Bandar bin Sultan, the Saudi ambassador here for more than 20 years, who resigned last week.

‘Free Cuba’

“Viva Cuba libre,” Caleb McCarry declared yesterday, after Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice announced his appointment as director of the U.S. efforts to promote democracy in Cuba and encourage the removal of Fidel Castro.

As the Cuban transition coordinator, Mr. McCarry will pursue ways to “accelerate the demise of Castro’s tyranny,” Miss Rice said.

“For nearly 50 years, the regime of Fidel Castro has condemned the people of Cuba to a tragic fate of repression and poverty,” she told U.S. officials and Cuban dissidents at a State Department ceremony to introduce Mr. McCarry, a veteran congressional aide.

President Bush’s Commission for Assistance to a Free Cuba, which urged the creation of the coordinator position last year, has a budget of $59 million to promote democracy on the island.

“We are empowering Cuban civil society to better organize and advocate democratic change,” Miss Rice said. “We are working to deny resources to the Castro regime and to broadcast the truth about its deplorable treatment of the Cuban people.”

She cited Mr. McCarry’s “lifetime of experience and expertise in Latin American affairs.” He has served as a senior Republican aide for the House International Relations Committee for the past eight years.

Call Embassy Row at 202/636-3297, fax 202/832-7278 or e-mail jmorrison@washingtontimes.com.

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