- The Washington Times - Tuesday, April 11, 2006

Leading in prayer

“[I]t can be no surprise that at the first meeting of the Continental Congress in Philadelphia, in September 1774, when news was received of the sudden outbreak of war in Boston, the very first motion on the floor was for a prayer to seek the guidance of Almighty God. …

“[George Washington] was intent on making his fighting force worthy of God’s favor and worked hard to clean up their behavior. ‘We can have little hopes of the blessing of Heaven on our arms if we insult it by our impiety and folly,’ stated one of his orders. ‘Let vice and immorality of every kind be discouraged, as much as possible, in your brigade; and as a chaplain is allowed to each regiment, see that the men regularly attend divine Worship,’ stipulated another.”

— Michael Novak and Jana Novak, writing on “Washington’s Faith and the Birth of America,” in the May issue of the American Enterprise

More direct

“Democrats opposed the ratification of the Central America Free Trade Agreement last year for fear that it would undercut American workers made to compete with cheap Latin American labor. The problem the Democrats must have had with this effect on American workers was that it was too indirect. The party now favors importing lots of that same cheap Latin American labor directly into the United States. …

“The thesis of the Thomas Frank book, ‘What’s the Matter with Kansas?’ has become gospel for Democrats — that working-class voters in the heartland are misled into voting against their economic interests by supporting Republicans. That argument needs an overhaul now that it is clear that Democrats think there’s nothing the matter with Kansas, or anywhere else, that can’t be solved by more wage-competition from a flood of foreign low-skill workers”

— Rich Lowry, writing on “Liberal Sellout,” yesterday in National Review Online at www.nationalreview.com

Hating her

“Hating Dr. Laura is a prerequisite for Americans shaped by the country’s me-first culture. For them, kicking around the popular radio host is almost as much fun as abusing the president. But what exactly do they hate? …

“They especially hate it when she condenses current legal reasoning on the subject of abortion into a simple, morally indefensible proposition: ‘If she wants it, it’s a baby. If she doesn’t, it’s not.’

“And they hate it when she says, ‘Do the right thing’ — as if most actions aren’t gloriously gray.

“Most of all they hate it when, having turned off the radio in disgust, a barely perceptible but persistent voice keeps whispering in their ears: ‘You know, don’t you, that what Dr. Laura just said is right?’”

— Richard Kirk, writing on “Hating Dr. Laura,” yesterday in WorldNetDaily at www.worldnetdaily.com

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