- The Washington Times - Sunday, December 17, 2006

Invisible man

“Decades ago, a thinker who’d witnessed oppression firsthand embarked upon a multibook investigation into the operations of society and power. Mingling philosophical analysis and historical observation, he produced an interpretation of modern life that traced its origins to the Enlightenment and came down to a fundamental opposition: the diverse energies of individuals versus the regulatory acts of the state and its rationalizing experts. …

“Here’s the rub: I don’t mean Michel Foucault. The description fits him, but it also fits someone less hallowed in academe today: Friedrich A. von Hayek, the economist and social philosopher. … He remains a key figure in conservative thought, an authority on free enterprise, individual liberty and centralized power.

“And yet, while Foucault and Hayek deal with similar topics, and while Hayek’s defense of free markets (for which he won the Nobel Prize in economics in 1974) influenced global politics far more than Foucault’s analyses of social institutions like psychiatry and prisons, the two thinkers enjoy contrary standing in the liberal-arts curriculum. Hayek’s work in economics has a fair presence in that field, and his social writings reach libertarians in the business school, but in the humanities and most of the social sciences he doesn’t even exist.”

— Mark Bauerlein, writing on “How Academe Shortchanges Conservative Thinking,” in the Dec. 15 issue of the Chronicle of Higher Education

Doomsday plan

“The fact is, Planet Earth cannot support the present human population. …

“When we consider ways to reduce the human population there is a natural dichotomy between ways that kill a very large number of people and ways that control the growth of the population, that is, ways that prevent people from breeding. …

“The world’s most affluent populations should be targeted first. …

“A triage approach will be necessary so that scarce medical resources go to those who can contribute most to the long-term viability of the planet. Consequently, many middle-aged-to-elderly people will die uncomfortable deaths. Not every problem is solvable. …

“The precepts of the Abrahamic religions, Judaism, Christianity and Islam represent the quintessential perversion of the human mind. They must be abandoned and the notion of the sanctity of human life must be subjugated to the greater sanctity of all life on Earth.”

— Australian neuroscientist John Reid, Dec. 10 on the “Occam’s Razor” Australian Broadcasting Company radio program

‘Blood libel’

“Here is [former President Jimmy] Carter’s description of the Middle East conflict in his own words, delivered during an interview he gave on National Public Radio during the second day of the Holocaust deniers’ conference in Tehran:

” ‘I have spent a lot of time in Palestine in recent years. … The Palestinians have had their own land, first of all, occupied and then confiscated and then colonized. … The Israelis have built more than 200 settlements inside Palestine. They connect these settlements with very nice roads for the Israeli settlers, and then superhighways and so forth going into Jerusalem. Quite often the Palestinians are prevented from even riding on those roads that have been built in their own territory. So this has been in many ways worse than it was in South Africa.’

“When hundreds of millions of Muslims are calling for the extermination of the Jews of Israel this is more than a lie; it is a blood libel.”

— David Horowitz, writing on “Jimmy Carter: Jew-Hater, Genocide-Enabler, Liar,” Thursday in Front Page at www.frontpagemag.com

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