- The Washington Times - Friday, December 22, 2006

By Alexa Dillahay, age 10

Central Elementary School, Edgewater, Md.

Let me start by introducing myself. My name is Alexa Dillahay, and I am 10 years old. My favorite hobbies are reading, lacrosse, basketball and soccer. I decided to read Mike Lupica’s “Miracle on 49th Street” because I like basketball very much and I love to read.

This book is about a girl named Molly’s journey to try to make a National Basketball Association Celtics star, Josh Cameron, realize that he is her biological father. In this book, Mike Lupica expresses Molly’s feelings about Josh Cameron not believing that she is his daughter.

Molly still has the letter her mom, Jen, gave to her before she died of cancer. Molly reads it whenever she misses her mother, and it’s kept a very special secret. Sam, her best friend, is the only one who knows Molly’s secret.

Inside the letter are the words, “Josh Cameron is your father.” Molly’s mission is to make Josh realize this and accept her as his daughter and want her to stick around, which he does not want at all. Josh only cares about two things: basketball and himself. He has no room in his life for a daughter. Molly needs a miracle.

My favorite part of the story is when Josh Cameron takes Molly to New York City for a weekend. They go to an ice-skating rink, and Josh tells Molly about Rockefeller Center and how great her mom was at ice-skating. He also tells her a story about when he and her mom were together. I like this part because it is the first moment when they actually seem like father and daughter.

This book gives the message never to give up your dream. Always keep trying until you achieve it.

I enjoyed reading this book, and I give it three stars. I recommend this book for sports lovers from 10 to 14.

LOAD COMMENTS ()

 

Click to Read More

Click to Hide