- The Washington Times - Wednesday, December 27, 2006

For years, Washington artist William Christenberry, 69, froze his beloved Alabama childhood of disintegrating buildings, rusting commercial signs, moldering graves and folk art into photographs, drawings, paintings, sculptures and building constructions. In Passing Time: The Art of William Christenberry, the Smithsonian American Art Museum surveys his vision with 60 iconic works from the Sprott Church series (glistening white, geometrically configured buildings painted, photographed and modeled), the KKK Group (two made with Brownie box cameras) and the frightening structural forms of Dream Buildings — and more. At the Smithsonian American Art Museum, Eighth and F streets Northwest. 11:30 a.m. to 7 p.m. daily through July 8. Free. 202/275-1715.

— Joanna Shaw-Eagle

During her phenomenal, workhorse youth Judy Garland appeared in about two dozen musicals produced by her home studio, Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, a string that ended in 1950 when she was fired for repeated absences from the movie version of “Annie Get Your Gun.” Although a remake of “A Star Is Born” for Warner Bros. in 1954 did provide Miss Garland with a personal triumph, it also proved her premature swan song as a film musical headliner, at the age of 32.

You can follow her star-crossed career as the American Film Institute Silver Theatre hosts a revival for the next week as part of its retrospective Judy Garland Sings! Daily showings of A Star Is Born begin tomorrow. Time remains to catch the final showings of The Wizard of Oz and Meet Me in St. Louis today. Easter Parade concludes the series with several showings that begin on Jan. 5. 8633 Colesville Road, Silver Spring. Tickets are $7.50 to $9.25. 301/495-6700 or afi.com/silver.

— Gary Arnold

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