- The Washington Times - Tuesday, May 9, 2006

MARYLAND

PERRYVILLE

Racist graffiti painted on school

For the second time this year, vandals spray-painted racist graffiti at Perryville High School.

The graffiti, which happened Thursday night or Friday morning, included racial slurs and included references to the Ku Klux Klan such as “KKK” and “the KKK will rise again,” as well as a misspelling of a common racial epithet.

Earlier this year, vandals scrawled a crude depiction of a lynching and racial epithets in a boys’ bathroom at the school.

LAUREL

Whooping crane eggs hatch

Two endangered whooping cranes whose eggs were taken from a nest in Wisconsin and flown to Maryland last week have hatched, the manager of the Necedah, Wis., National Wildlife Refuge said yesterday.

Larry Wargowsky said the eggs were taken Thursday to the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center in Laurel, where one of them hatched Friday and the other Sunday.

They are the first to hatch from the flock that migrates between Wisconsin and Florida, he said, although others have previously been hatched in another migratory flock in the western United States.

“We have cause to celebrate now,” he said.

Mr. Wargowsky said the cranes would return to Wisconsin this summer to learn how to follow an ultralight plane in the fall to the Chassahowitzka National Wildlife Refuge in Florida as other whooping cranes in the flock have done the past five years.

FREDERICK

Head-on crash kills woman on I-270

A Frederick woman was killed in a head-on crash on Interstate 270 near Urbana early yesterday morning.

Carol Loy, 61, was driving to her job as a nurse at Holy Cross Hospital in Silver Spring in the southbound lanes about 5 a.m.

Police said another southbound driver had crashed his car moments earlier into a guardrail then drove off in the wrong direction — resulting in a head-on crash with Miss Loy’s car.

The driver of the other car, Kwasi Osei Ofosu, 36, of Gaithersburg, was in fair condition at a Hospital.

Police said alcohol might have been a factor in the crash.

ABINGDON

Three in custody in home invasion

Harford County authorities have arrested a third suspect in a home invasion and knife attack late Sunday night.

The sheriff’s office said Matthew Tingler was arrested outside his Joppa home yesterday afternoon.

Mr. Tingler, Richard Schofield and Charles Fruhling face charges including attempted murder in the attack.

Three men broke into the home Mr. Schofield’s ex-girlfriend and a male friend of hers, police said.

The man, Mark Travers, was stabbed in both legs and flown to the University of Maryland Shock Trauma Center, where he was in critical condition yesterday.

Mr. Tingler was to appear before a court commissioner last night. Mr. Schofield was being held on $1 million bail, and Mr. Fruhling was being held without bail.

BALTIMORE

School system set to be deficit-free

The school system will be deficit-free by the end of June, the first time in seven years that the system has not faced a deficit, schools chief Bonnie S. Copeland said yesterday.

The system had faced a $58 million deficit. More than a year ago, the city lent $42 million to the school system to help it become solvent. The schools will finish paying off the balance of that loan next month.

Mrs. Copeland said that eliminating the deficit will allow for the hiring of more school police officers and hall monitors and that some laid-off employees might be brought back.

VIRGINIA

CHESAPEAKE

Bigamist sentenced to year in jail

A man whose appearance on the “Dr. Phil” show led to a bigamy charge against him was sentenced yesterday to a year in jail.

Charles Edward Hicks, 62, was sentenced in Chesapeake Circuit Court. Hicks — who has been married seven times — had pleaded guilty to marrying his sixth wife in Chesapeake while still married to his fifth wife in Florida.

It was the second time he had been married to two women at once.

Hicks was charged after a girlfriend’s sister saw him profiled on “Dr. Phil.” His attorney suggested in court yesterday that the dual marriages were an oversight.

But a prosecutor called Hicks “predatory,” and two of the women he married testified that he left them with emotional scars and a pile of bills.

SUFFOLK

Inducing-abortion charge dropped

A charge of inducing an abortion was dismissed yesterday in the case of a woman who shot herself in the stomach on the morning her baby was to have been born.

Tammy Skinner, 22, told police Feb. 23 that a man had picked her up, shot her and pushed her out of the car. Then, she told investigators that the child’s father did it.

Finally, the mother of two other children — both girls, as was the fetus who died — admitted that the wound was self-inflicted.

Miss Skinner also was charged with using a firearm in a felony, but that charge was not prosecuted. She was convicted of filing a false police report and was given a 30-day suspended jail sentence.

Prosecutor Marie Walls also asked General District Judge James A. Moore Jr. to require Miss Skinner to pay the cost of the police investigation of $750 to $1,500. A hearing on that matter was set for July 10.

The judge tossed the abortion charge based on defense attorneys’ arguments that cases filed under similar laws in Florida and Georgia had been dismissed.

Miss Walls declined to comment on the outcome of the case.

JAMESTOWN

Godspeed arrives to cheers, cannon

A replica of one of the ships that carried English settlers to Virginia has arrived at Jamestown Settlement.

The Godspeed arrived ahead of schedule Sunday and was greeted by cheers and a cannon boom near where the original ship ended its voyage from England in May 1607.

The Godspeed will stay in Virginia for two weeks, then head out again for an 80-day promotional tour of six East Coast ports. The tour aims to generate interest in the commemoration of Jamestown 2007, an 18-month series of events marking the 400th anniversary of North America’s first permanent English settlement.

The $2.6 million replica was built in Rockport, Maine. The three-masted ship is powered by twin diesel engines and sails.

CHARLES CITY

Kaine, Scott push for tribes’ recognition

Gov. Timothy M. Kaine and U.S. Rep. Robert C. Scott plan to continue lobbying for federal recognition of six Virginia Indian tribes.

Mr. Kaine and Mr. Scott, both Democrats, spoke last weekend at the Virginia Indian Nations spring Pow Wow yesterday at the Chickahominy Tribal Grounds in Charles City County.

Federally recognized tribes are eligible for assistance programs, an established government-to-government relationship, various exemptions from local and state laws for their tribal lands and housing and educational opportunities.

The tribes seeking recognition are the Nansemond, Chickahominy, Eastern Chickahominy, Upper Mattaponi, Rappahannock and Monacan Indian Nation. About 3,000 to 4,000 Virginians trace their ancestry to Virginia’s eight indigenous tribes.

Virginia tribal leaders hope to get the federal designation before the events marking the 400th anniversary of the founding of Jamestown. Some tribal leaders have publicly said they might opt out of Jamestown events if the federal government doesn’t recognize their tribes.

WOODBRIDGE

9/11 memorial to be dedicated

A memorial to honor 22 Prince William County residents killed on September 11, 2001, at the Pentagon and World Trade Center will be dedicated today.

The 9/11 Liberty Memorial was constructed at the county’s McCoart Administration Center. It includes a pool of water in the shape of a pentagon, two fountains to represent the World Trade Center towers and a walkway made of Pennsylvania flagstone to represent Flight 93’s crash in Pennsylvania.

Stone from the Pentagon fire is included in the design. The names of those who died are inscribed in stone at the side of the pool.

The wives of two men who died at the Pentagon led the effort to raise nearly $500,000 for the memorial.

Prince William Board of County Supervisors Chairman Sean Connaughton called the memorial a true tribute to those who died.

From wire dispatches and staff reports

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