Letters to the editor

continued from page 2

Question of the Day

Is it still considered bad form to talk politics during a social gathering?

View results

3) Eighty percent of those deaths occur at the end of pregnancy from conditions such as eclampsia, hemorrhages and puerperal sepsis.

4) No woman has died in Nicaragua for not having a “therapeutic” abortion since the practice was banned in November 2006.

5) As before, women with complications from pregnancy must be offered necessary treatment, even if such treatment may indirectly cause the death of their unborn babies. The law allows such medical procedures, and physicians failing to provide such care are liable.

The above positive results are similar to those in other countries with strict anti-abortion legislation, such as Chile, El Salvador and Ireland.

Another positive result, not in any way to be minimized, is that more Nicaraguan children have escaped the abortionists’ knives, poisons and suction machines.

This AP story has helped fuel unprecedented international interference in Nicaragua’s national life. For more than a year, our country has been subjected to intense pressure, not only from the usual radical feminist and misguided human rights internationalists, but also from some foreign governments, including some European countries that have threatened to cut off their financial aid to our country if we don’t change our law to suit their pro-abortion views.

Thankfully, Nicaragua has been able so far to resist this pressure. Our sovereignty is still intact. The entire free world needs to look up to Nicaragua as an example of courage and strength in the face of a never-before-seen effort to strip Nicaragua of its sovereignty and dignity.

DR. WALTER MENDIETA

President

Asociacion Medica Nicaraguense

Managua, Nicaragua

Lucia Bohemer

President

Asociacion Nicaraguense de la Mujer

Managua, Nicaragua

Story Continues →

View Entire Story
Comments
blog comments powered by Disqus