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His point that the only problem in persuading potential HIV/AIDS sufferers to get tested is that it costs the person being tested $5.36 or $11.46, depending on his or her insurance, or $17.50 for the uninsured.

His protestation of the burden of paying up to $17.50 does not convince anyone that cost is the problem, and therefore this appears to be a joke.

Further, he acknowledges that physical changes from HIV/AIDS-induced facial fat wasting forces sufferers to “out” themselves.

He then shoots down his concern about those not getting tested by complaining that Medicare won’t pay for the cosmetic procedure to hide the infection.

The real truth about the cause of HIV/AIDS infection in America, as well as in Africa and elsewhere, is sexual promiscuity.

If there were no sexual promiscuity among heterosexuals or homosexuals, further HIV/AIDS transmission would end very quickly. It is criminal to spend taxpayers’ hard-earned money for HIV/AIDS funding that concentrates on anything other than ending sexual promiscuity.

WAYNE HEMBREE

Bowie

In his Monday letter, “A weak response to HIV/AIDS,” Dr. Gary Blick blames the government for the disappointing response to the call by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for routine HIV testing.

I have been personally involved in the HIV diagnostic industry since it appeared in the mid-1980s. (HIV had been around since the early 1960s but did not appear as full-blown AIDS until the ‘80s.)

Diagnostic testing has been available for more than 20 years. Many promising events have occurred in both the diagnosis and treatment of HIV/AIDS, but many disappointments likewise have occurred, and most have been blamed on the government.

HIV diagnosis has been available for years for pregnant women and, with prophylactic treatment, can be the lifesaving step for the resultant newborn.

This test was blinded for years to “protect” the expectant mother from the stigma of being labeled HIV-positive; thus, the HIV virus likely was passed to the newborn.

HIV diagnosis in pregnant women is still not required universally because of privacy issues, not government intervention.

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