- The Washington Times - Friday, February 2, 2007

PONTE VEDRA BEACH, Fla. (AP) — George Burger, a former political consultant who became vice president of the PGA Tour’s new FedExCup competition, has died. He was 50.

Mr. Burger died Jan. 31 of complications from bacterial spinal meningitis at a Jacksonville hospital. Mr. Burger experienced severe back pain Jan. 13 during the Sony Open in Honolulu. His death was confirmed by PGA Tour Commissioner Tim Finchen.

Mr. Burger spent several years as a public relations strategist, political consultant and campaign manager in Washington. He was general manager of Edelman Public Relations until joining the PGA Tour in October 2005.

He also was president of the Robert Trent Jones Golf Club in Northern Virginia and was general chairman and tournament director when the Presidents Cup was held there in 2005.

Calvin Plimpton, 89, ex-Amherst president

AMHERST, Mass. (AP) — Calvin H. Plimpton, a former Amherst College president credited with starting the process that led to the admission of women to the prestigious liberal arts school, died Jan. 30. He was 89.

Dr. Plimpton died at his home in Westwood, Mass., of complications after surgery following a fall, a college spokesman said.

Dr. Plimpton was Amherst’s president from 1960 to 1971. In January 1970, he appointed a Long Range Planning Commission as a response to a student-approved resolution calling for the admission of women.

The commission’s recommendations to admit women were approved in 1974, and the school admitted women for the first time in 1975, spokesman Paul Statt said.

The Massachusetts native was a 1939 graduate of Amherst College and attended Harvard Medical School.

After a stint in the Army, he practiced medicine in New York and was assistant dean of Columbia University’s College of Physicians and Surgeons before returning to Amherst.

After leaving Amherst, he served as president of Downstate Medical Center in New York and as chief of staff at American University Hospital in Beirut.

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