- The Washington Times - Sunday, January 28, 2007

Tamil attack

Sri Lanka’s ambassador denounced a recent rebel suicide attack on a merchant ship carrying wheat to feed tens of thousands of ethnic Tamils, whom the rebels claim to represent.

Ambassador Bernard Goonetilleke said the seaborne attack by the Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam last week damaged the hull of the City of Liverpool merchant ship and injured one crew member but failed to prevent the delivery of wheat flour to feed 500,000 civilians on the Jaffna Peninsula. He called the attack another rebel attempt to create a propaganda victory.

“The Tamil Tigers are always making representations to the international community about the plight of Tamil civilians in the midst of a humanitarian situation, while doing everything within their means to create such a situation to achieve their political agenda,” he said.

Diplomatic traffic

Foreign visitors in Washington this week include:

Today

• Sen. Mushahid Hussain Sayed of Pakistan, chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee and secretary-general of the ruling party, the Pakistan Muslim League. He addresses the United States Institute of Peace and the Prince Alwaleed Bin-Talal Center for Muslim-Christian Understanding at Georgetown University.

• Marcelo Dascal, a professor of philosophy and former dean of students at Israel’s Tel Aviv University, who addresses the Middle East Institute on the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.

Tomorrow

• Defense Minister Sorin Frunzaverde of Romania, who is accompanied by Adm. Gheorghe Marin, chief of staff. On their three-day visit, they meet J.D. Crouch II, deputy national security adviser; Gordon England, deputy defense secretary; R. Nicholas Burns, undersecretary of state for political affairs; Gen. Peter Pace, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff; Sen. Carl Levin, Michigan Democrat and chairman of the Senate Armed Services Committee; and Rep. Solomon P. Ortiz, Texas Democrat and chairman of the House Armed Services subcommittee on readiness.

Wednesday

• Ambassador Edmond Mulet of Guatemala, the U.N. secretary-general’s special envoy to Haiti. He gives a briefing at the Center for Strategic and International Studies.

• Anatoliy Kinakh, former prime minister of Ukraine, who addresses the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.

• Marta Lagos, executive director of Latinobarometro, a public opinion polling firm in Santiago, Chile. She joins a panel discussion on democracy in Latin America at the Inter-American Dialogue.

• Hamed Wardak, founder of the Sacrificers for Peace (or Fedayeen-e-Sol) based in Kabul, Afghanistan. He addresses the Central Asia-Caucasus Institute of Johns Hopkins University’s Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies on civil society in Afghanistan.

• Kamila Telendibaeva of the Uyghur Canadian Association. Her husband, Huseyin Celil, is imprisoned in China for advocating religious freedom. She participates in a panel discussion organized by the United States Commission on International Religious Freedom from 1:30 p.m. to 4 p.m. in Room 538 of the Dirksen Senate Office Building.

Thursday

• Marat Abdyrazakovich Sultanov, speaker of the parliament of Kyrgyzstan, who addresses the Central Asia-Caucasus Institute of Johns Hopkins University’s Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies on the new constitution of the Central Asian republic.

Friday

• Foreign Minister Frank-Walter Steinmeier of Germany and Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov of Russia, who meet with Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice and a U.N. representative as part of the “Quartet” of envoys from the United States, Russia, the European Union and the United Nations seeking to revive the Middle East peace process. Mr. Steinmeier represents the European Union because Germany currently holds the presidency of the bloc.

• Call Embassy Row at 202/636-3297, fax 202/832-7278 or e-mail jmorrison @washingtontimes.com.

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