Students struggle with rising tuition

Question of the Day

Should Congress make English the official language of the U.S.?

View results

EAST LANSING, Mich. (AP) — Michigan State University senior Katie Wright worries that college tuition is rising so fast that some working-class families, including her own, soon may find higher education unaffordable.

Michigan is one of a few states where tuition at some public universities will increase by nearly 10 percent. Four-year public schools in Colorado, Illinois and Oklahoma also plan tuition increases that could at least triple the general inflation rate.

The typical bill for a full-time in-state undergraduate at Michigan State will climb by roughly $800 this academic year under the current plan, a 9.6 percent increase that puts the annual tuition and fee bill past $9,500 in some cases. That doesn’t include room and board.

“I’ve been worried about paying for this year constantly, just figuring out how it’s going to work out,” said Miss Wright, a zoology major who hopes to become a veterinarian. “For people who don’t necessarily have a lot of money … I think they’re going to be pushing those people out.”

This week, the House passed legislation to lower interest rates on student loans and increase Pell Grant aid to poor people who want to go to college. Several state universities, while adopting higher tuition rates, also are expanding financial aid programs to try to keep access open for a diverse student body.

The states hardest hit often have struggling economies or other government budget problems that have limited the amount of general state taxpayer aid going to public universities.

In Michigan, which has the nation’s highest unemployment rate and a projected deficit for the fiscal year beginning Oct. 1 of at least $1.6 billion, most public universities got less money from the state last fiscal year than in the 2001-02 year. Some of the payments promised to schools this fiscal year will be delayed.

At the other end of the spectrum, public universities in Ohio plan to freeze rates in some cases after years of relatively high tuition increases.

The average tuition and fee bill nationwide at a four-year, public university reached $5,836 last academic year, up 42 percent from 2002-03 levels, according to data weighted by enrollment from the College Board. In Michigan, average tuition and fees were about $7,260 last year, up roughly 35 percent to 38 percent since the 2002-03 academic year, according to unweighted data provided by the Presidents Council, a group representing Michigan public universities.

Oakland University in southeast Michigan plans to raise tuition by 13.9 percent, its largest increase since the economic doldrums of the early 1980s slashed Michigan’s state university aid. This fall’s increase means the annual bill for an undergraduate in-state resident taking 15 credits per semester would rise $971 to $7,927.

“More students are having to work at two or three jobs,” said Jameelah Muhammad, vice president of Oakland’s student congress. “They’re taking out loans and graduating with more debt. It’s intense. Am I going to eat or pay my tuition bills? It’s getting like that for some students.”

Comments
blog comments powered by Disqus