Continued from page 2

The New Jersey case centered on a 63-acre tract in Paulsboro made up mostly of wetlands just across the Delaware River from Philadelphia International Airport.

NORTH CAROLINA

Billy Graham’s wife close to death

RALEIGH — Ruth Graham, the ailing wife of evangelist Billy Graham, fell into a coma yesterday morning and appears to be close to death, a family spokesman said.

“She appears to be entering the final stages of life,” said Larry Ross, Mr. Graham’s personal spokesman.

He made the announcement the same day that Mr. Graham said he and his wife will be buried at the recently dedicated Billy Graham Library in Charlotte. He said his 87-year-old wife, who has degenerative osteoarthritis of the back and neck and has been bedridden at their home in the mountains of western North Carolina for some time, “is close to going home to heaven.”

“Ruth is my soul mate and best friend, and I cannot imagine living a single day without her by my side,” Mr. Graham said. “I am more in love with her today than when we first met over 65 years ago as students at Wheaton College.”

Mr. Ross said Mrs. Graham was treated two weeks ago for pneumonia and her health temporarily improved before declining because of her weakened condition. Mr. Ross said she is being treated at her home.

NORTH DAKOTA

Nonprofit to offer harvest assistance

BISMARCK — They have planted crops for farmers who have lost arms in equipment accidents and a few who have been hospitalized with serious illnesses.

Farm Rescue volunteers recently finished their second planting season, helping farmers in the Dakotas and Minnesota who have suffered financial hardship through injury, sickness or an act of nature.

The nonprofit group now intends to expand its scope and help six farmers harvest their crops this fall, said Bill Gross, an airplane pilot and North Dakota native who founded the organization.

Farm Rescue seeded about 8,000 acres this year for 12 North Dakota farmers and one producer each in South Dakota and Minnesota. The group relies on donations, volunteers and corporate sponsors.

OREGON

Story Continues →