- The Washington Times - Wednesday, May 9, 2007

The National Gallery of Art’s Fabulous Journeys and Faraway Places: Travels on Paper, 1450-1700 takes us back to artists’ printed works of real and fanciful travel and trips to exotic lands. Europeans were fascinated by the Middle East, and Pieter Coecke van Aelst’s “The Ways and Fashions of the Turks” (1553), a 16-foot-long panorama of a journey to Constantinople, is a highlight. At the National Gallery, Fourth Street and Constitution Avenue NW, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Saturday, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Sunday through Sept. 16. Free. 202/842-6176.

— Joanna Shaw-Eagle

This is the centennial month for three legendary actors: Katharine Hepburn, Sir Laurence Olivier and John Wayne, born respectively on May 12, 22 and 26 in 1907. The American Film Institute Silver Theatre has scheduled fleeting salutes to Miss Hepburn by reviving The Philadelphia Story this weekend and to Sir Laurence by reviving his Oscar-winning Hamlet on May 19, 20 and 22. Mr. Wayne is being accorded the closest thing to an extended and timely tribute: a series called “The Duke: John Wayne’s Centennial,” which begins Saturday at 3:30 p.m. with a revival of his first starring feature, The Big Trail of 1930, in a restored 70 mm print.

The Wayne series consists of 10 movies, a numerical drop in the bucket for a career that lasted almost 50 years and accumulated about 250 credits. Nine of the Wayne pictures are Westerns, seven of them directed by John Ford while he and the actor sustained one of the most distinctive collaborations in Hollywood history. The Ford cycle begins May 18 with Stagecoach. The series continues through July 4.

The AFI Silver is at 8633 Colesville Road, Silver Spring. Admission is $7.50 to $9.25. Call 301/495-6700 or see afi.com/silver.

— Gary Arnold

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