- The Washington Times - Monday, August 25, 2008

Jeffrey Birnbaum, a veteran Washington journalist, TV commentator and award-winning author, has been named managing editor of The Washington Times’ digital media operations, Executive Editor John Solomon announced.

“It’s a very exciting opportunity for me, and I am looking forward to working at The Times,” said Mr. Birnbaum.

“It’s a great challenge to work with the growing parts of the news business and also to keep a hand in choosing what stories to pursue and what areas to cover,” he added.

At The Times, Mr. Birnbaum’s primary responsibilities will include helping oversee the paper’s Web products, its expanding television and radio operations, and some new content syndication products that the newspaper is developing.

“Jeff is one of Washington’s most influential and informative journalists, and we’re excited to add his firepower to The Times,” Mr. Solomon said. “He is perfectly suited to lead our efforts to expand The Times’ already growing suite of digital products while injecting his own expert insight and high-caliber journalism to our daily report.”

For the past 4 1/2 years, Mr. Birnbaum has written about the connections between business, lobbying and politics for The Washington Post, authoring the weekly column “On K Street.”

In addition, he is a political analyst for the Fox News Channel, as well as a panelist on the PBS public-affairs program “Washington Week.” He is also national political analyst for Fox News Radio and is a commentator on the popular national radio broadcast “Marketplace.”

He will continue to appear on Fox News Channel and other Fox outlets while working at The Washington Times.

A native of Scranton, Pa., and 1977 graduate of the University of Pennsylvania, Mr. Birnbaum worked for nine years for Time magazine and sister publication Fortune before joining the Post in 2004, including seven years as Fortune’s Washington bureau chief.

Before that, he spent 16 years at the Wall Street Journal, rising to become the paper’s White House correspondent.

In addition, he has published four books on money, politics and policy. His 1987 book, “Showdown at Gucci Gulch,” written with Wall Street Journal colleague Alan Murray, chronicled the huge fight over a 1986 tax-reform bill, and was honored by the American Political Science Association as one of the best books of the year.

His most recent book, “The Money Men: The Real Story of Fund-raising’s Influence on Political Power in America,” looks at the central role of money in modern American campaigns.