- The Washington Times - Wednesday, December 10, 2008

CHICAGO (AP) — Illinois Gov. Rod Blagovich returned to work on Wednesday, a day after he was arrested and accused of scheming to enrich himself by selling President-elect Barack Obama’s vacant Senate seat.

Blagojevich (bluh-GOY’-uh-vich) is out on bond and has denied any wrongdoing.

The governor left his home on Chicago’s North Side early Wednesday and waved to the media before quickly getting into a dark SUV without talking to the reporters.

A short time later, Blagojevich’s SUV arrived at his office.

“He is still the sitting governor of Illinois today, now, and that is not something we have any say in or control of,” U.S. Attorney Patrick J. Fitzgerald said in unveiling corruption charges on Tuesday against the 52-year-old governor.

The governor’s attorney, Sheldon Sorosky, said Tuesday he didn’t know of any immediate plans for the governor to resign. Blagojevich believes he didn’t do anything wrong and asks Illinois residents to have faith in him, Sorosky said.

“I suppose we will have to go to trial,” he said.

Blagojevich could still appoint someone to fill Obama’s seat despite the charges that he tried to barter it away for cash or a plum job in what Fitzgerald called “a political corruption crime spree.”

But it would take a lot of nerve and Blagojevich would have to hurry because state lawmakers are racing to snatch away his power to appoint a new senator and put it in the hands of voters.

“No appointment by this governor, under these circumstances, could produce a credible replacement,” U.S. Sen. Dick Durbin said Tuesday after the governor, a second-term Democrat, was arrested on charges of conspiring to commit fraud and soliciting bribery.

Until state lawmakers call a special election, though, Blagojevich still has the power to fill the Senate seat left vacant by President-elect Obama. Obama was not accused of any wrongdoing.

“I had no contact with the governor or his office, and so we were not I was not aware of what was happening,” Obama said. “And as I said, it’s a sad day for Illinois. Beyond that, I don’t think it’s appropriate to comment.”

Prosecutors stepped in and had the governor arrested because he was on “what can only be called a political corruption crime spree,” Fitzgerald said.

Speaker Michael Madigan, D-Chicago, said he is prepared to call the Illinois House into session as early as Monday to set a special election to fill the seat. Illinois Senate President Emil Jones said he had something similar in mind.

In Washington, Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., made it plain he didn’t want to seat anyone under such a cloud, saying the charges “are appalling and represent as serious a breach of the public trust as I have ever heard.”

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