A simultaneous combustion

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Said another teammate, Dominic Cheek: “They always hang together - like a magnet.”

Most members of the squad rely on the twins’ jersey numbers to tell them apart, and Plumlee even formulated a mnemonic device to help him keep them straight.

“[No.] 41 is David because ‘D’ comes before ‘T’ in the alphabet and ‘1’ comes before ‘2,’” Plumlee said.

Assistant coach Anthony Grant has learned to identify David by his slightly thinner face, but Cheek has no time for such careful observations.

“They got the same name,” Cheek says. “I just call them ‘Twin.’”

Though U.S. coach Bob McKillop claims he can’t tell which is the superior player - David’s scoring average was 0.7 higher than Travis’ last season - he believes their identical styles confuse defenders who discover they have picked up the wrong man.

“When I coached them in youth league, I would always assign them numbers that were close, like 21 and 12,” dad David Wear said. “Soon enough I would have two guys guarding one and have the other with a wide-open layup.”

Getting them to argue about their game might be the only way to keep them from starting and finishing their sentences simultaneously.

“Travis,” David said when asked which of the two is the better ball handler.

Said Travis: “Yeah, he does get a little careless sometimes.”

Shooter?

“Oh you know, that’s me,” Travis said. “I’ll give you ball handling, but I am a better shooter for sure.”

Said David: “All right, I’ll give you that. On a certain day.”

They bicker back and forth momentarily on who is more aggressive on defense before proudly announcing that they have the same vertical leap.

Exactly?

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