- The Washington Times - Sunday, July 13, 2008

NO. 5 THE HOMESTEAD (CASCADES), PAR 5

The second shot on this lengthy three-shotter is hit from the base of a hill to a tight landing area. Reaching the green in two is almost impossible.

NO. 8 HOLLY HILLS COUNTRY CLUB, PAR 4

A good drive gets you to the top of the hill, but often players are left with the most thrilling shot in the region – over a hill to a peninsula green.

NO. 16 CANNON RIDGE GOLF CLUB, PAR 5

The third shot is often played from a valley (avoid the bunker down there) to a very elevated green. The pin isn’t visible; use the birdhouse as your target.

NO. 2 MARYLAND NATIONAL GOLF CLUB, PAR 5

The closer you get to the tree on the left, the better chance of reaching in two but the more trouble you bring into play (rough, bunkers and the tree).

NO. 4 WAVERLY WOODS GOLF CLUB, PAR 4

A well-placed tee shot offers a better view, but most are faced with a lengthy uphill shot where a mound left of the green blocks your view.

NO. 2 STONELEIGH GOLF CLUB, PAR 4

The hole shoots straight uphill. From a tiered fairway, the approach shot must elevate the natural terrain and a stone wall fronting the green.

NO. 12 HUNTER’S OAK GOLF CLUB, PAR 5

You can go for this par 5 in two, but the green sits in a bowl with no view from the fairway. It’s a risky shot, even if you’ve played it a few times.

NO. 4 WASHINGTON GOLF & CC, PAR 5

The green was inadvertently built on property not owned by the club. The owner got a dues-free life membership; the club got a risk-reward par 5.

NO. 8 MANOR COUNTRY CLUB, PAR 3

Arthur Hills asked that a large “carbunkle” (mound) that supports a front greenside bunker be built high enough to obscure most of the green.

NO. 12 LITTLE BENNETT, PAR 3

For a downhill par 3, this is as blind as it gets. The 50-foot drop shields the green entirely from the back tee and partially from the more forward tees.

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