- The Washington Times - Monday, July 21, 2008

WEEKEND REWIND >> IN CASE YOU MISSED IT

Redskins trade for Taylor after Daniels goes down: If you had play No. 1 in the “when the Redskins will lose their first starter in camp pool,” congratulations - Phillip Daniels went down early on Day 1 with a torn ACL. It didn’t take long for Vinny Cerrato to respond, trading for Dolphins All-Pro defensive end Jason Taylor. It’s not surprising the Redskins traded draft picks (2009 second-round pick, 2010 sixth-round pick) for an aging veteran - it’s a surprise it took then until the start of training camp to do so.

Harrington wins British Open… again: Padraig Harrington’s second straight Open win may get the headlines, but 53-year-old Greg Norman was the star of the show this weekend. The Shark took a two-shot lead into the final round, and even though he lost, it’s hard to criticize him for losing yet another lead at a major. For a part-time player on his honeymoon just to be in contention is a remarkable achievement. But even if he had won, new wife Chris Evert is still the best athlete in the family.

TWT FIVE >> OLDEST GOLF MAJOR WINNERS

If Greg Norman had held on to win the British Open, he would have been the oldest major winner in golf history at 53:

1. Julius Boros: 1968 PGA Championship, 48 years, 4 months, 18 days. Boros’ PGA Championship win was the third and final major of his career.

2. Jack Nicklaus: 1986 Masters, 46 years, 2 months, 23 days. Nicklaus’ final-round 65 gave him a one-stroke win over Tom Kite and perhaps golf’s most famous runner-up, Norman.

3. Tom Morris Sr.: 1867 British Open, 46 years, 99 days. Little known fact - Morris held the record for largest margin of victory in a major (13 strokes) until Tiger Woods obliterated the 2000 U.S. Open field to win by 15.

4. Hale Irwin: 1990 U.S. Open, 45 years, 15 days old. All three of Irwin’s major wins came at the U.S. Open, the other two in 1974 and 1979.

5. Roberto DeVicenzo: 1967 British Open, 44 years, 93 days. DeVicenzo is known more for signing an incorrect scorecard at the 1968 Masters that potentially cost him his second major.

HE SAID WHAT?

“Do I have to go and work on something? Not really, because I’m not planning on playing too much golf.” - Greg Norman

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