Reversion to old ways is quite quick

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A: The practices are shorter, but their tempo is faster. To put it musically, a Gibbs camp was WMZQ. Zorn’s is DC-101.

Q: How did the rookie receivers look on their first day?

A: Devin Thomas used his strength to push off and gain leverage on defensive backs. Malcolm Kelly beat veteran Fred Smoot on a diving catch. Fred Davis didn’t oversleep.

Q: Did Clinton Portis dress up as one of his characters for the start of camp?

A: No. Portis has rarely come in costume since the 2005 season, but he did wear sweat-inducing black tights when everyone else was in shorts.

Q: How about Chris Cooley? Any special outfit?

A: Nope, but the Pro Bowl tight end, who is growing a beard, was the first player in the ice tub after the morning practice.

Q: You just mentioned Randle El, the rookie receivers, Portis and Cooley. Throw in Santana Moss and how does Zorn keep them all happy?

A: That’s the kind of problem coaches love to have. Asked about Portis taking advantage of the talent around him, Zorn said, “Putting three wide receivers on the field - we’ve got a slew - and then Chris Cooley on the field with Clinton Portis, how are you going to defend us?”

Q: So Sunday was just Day 1 of the long march to the Super Bowl in Tampa, right?

A: Not hardly. The Redskins have a coach who has never been a coordinator, let alone the big boss. Their quarterback remains unproven. Their front seven on defense was thin before the trade for Taylor. And although they made the playoffs last season, the Redskins were 10-18 from Sept. 11, 2006, through Dec. 5, 2007. They’re in the rigorous NFC East and play all three of their division road games before Columbus Day; they could be out of the race before baseball’s league championship series begin. A .500 season would have been a decent start to the Zorn era, but Taylor, the 2006 defensive player of the year, could make them contenders.

About the Author
David Elfin

David Elfin

David Elfin has been following Washington-area sports teams since the late 1960s. David began his journalism career at Bethesda-Chevy Chase High School, the University of Pennsylvania (B.A., history) and Syracuse University (M.S., telecommunications). He wrote for the Bulletin (Philadelphia), the Post-Standard (Syracuse) and The Washington Post before coming to The Washington Times in 1986. He has covered colleges, the Orioles ...

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