- The Washington Times - Saturday, September 13, 2008


No Jordan Steffy. Coming off arguably the worst loss of Ralph Friedgen’s tenure. And facing a team that won 66-3 last week. Enjoy, Terrapins fans. California at Maryland. Noon, ESPN


Antwine Perez probably ranks second on the list of people with Maryland athletic department ties who are also connected with Woodrow Wilson High School in Camden, N.J.

The other one would be basketball coach Gary Williams, who started his career there way back in the day.

Of course, there will be plenty to write about Gary soon enough (just five weeks until practice starts). For now, a little more on Perez, who will start in place of Terrell Skinner on Saturday for Maryland.

“Antwine is a John Lynch hitter at safety,” linebacker Dave Philistin said. “He brings quite the run support that we need. Antwine is a rangy player. He’s very smart as far as his football knowledge. His football IQ is very good.”

So, to dispel any questions about the guy, Perez can most definitely play the run. That’s what Maryland is looking for him to do. The Terps plan to bring in Jamari McCollough to work in coverage situations, since that plays to his strength and hides a relative weakness in Perez’s game.

- Patrick Stevens


1. Mariano Rivera’s cutter - “Enter the Sandman” and the most unhittable closing pitch in baseball have been staples of Rivera’s Hall-of-Fame career.

2. Trevor Hoffman’s change-up - Thrown with a palmball grip, Hoffman is baseball’s all-time saves leader.

3. Bruce Sutter’s splitter - The pitch helped Sutter get bids to six All-Star Games and the 1979 National League Cy Young.

4. Gregg Olson’s curveball - Three seasons of 30-plus saves with the Orioles in the mid-90s earned Olson a special place in team history.

5. Billy Wagner’s fastball - Sure, it’s just a fastball, but Wagner’s 100-mph fireball creates an electric stadium atmosphere and intimidates hitters.

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