- The Washington Times - Thursday, April 30, 2009

ANALYSIS/OPINION:

Your April 24 editorial “MADD about regulation” misrepresented Chuck Hurley, who has dedicated much of his life to traffic safety. Mr. Hurley does not have an “obsession with red-light and speed cameras,” as the editorial claimed. In 2004, he served on the volunteer advisory board of the National Campaign to Stop Red Light Running as a representative of the National Safety Council. The uncompensated advisory board consists of a variety of traffic-safety experts asked to serve based on their field of expertise.

The campaign is not a lobbying front group. It is a nonprofit safety-advocacy organization managed by Blakey & Agnew, our public relations and communications firm. It seeks to inform the public about the lifesaving value of automated enforcement.

As with many Washington public relations firms, we provide association management among our services. The National Campaign to Stop Red Light Running is, and always has been, funded by grants from the photo-enforcement industry, which we say explicitly on the campaign’s Web site. Our contact information is also listed on the Web site, so we found the editorial’s inclusion of our phone number highly questionable and unorthodox. We already have received obscene phone calls as a result of your paper’s editorial.

One of the campaign’s primary functions is providing information to police departments, driving schools, local governments and traffic-safety organizations. We have provided individuals and organizations with tens of thousands of bumper stickers and posters that make no mention of photo enforcement.

Mr. Hurley would be an excellent administrator of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. We applaud his nomination.

LESLIE BLAKEY and JEFF AGNEW

Principals of Blakey & Agnew

Washington

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