- The Washington Times - Monday, May 11, 2009

The BlackBerry Curve outsold Apple’s iPhone in the first quarter, according to market researchers at the NPD Group.

For one stretch last year, Apple said it sold more iPhones than RIM, the longtime market leader, sold BlackBerrys.

But in the first three months of this year, the Curve, a product line that launched in 2007, stole the title back. It benefited from its widespread availability, since it is sold by all four major U.S. wireless carriers, while the iPhone is available in the U.S. only through AT&T Inc. A buy-one-get-one-free promotion by Verizon Wireless also helped the Curve, NPD analyst Ross Rubin said.

The iPhone slipped to No. 2, while RIM’s touch-screen BlackBerry Storm — also available through Verizon Wireless — came in third.

NPD did not release sales numbers along with the rankings, saying those expanded figures are only provided to clients.

Apple said it shipped wireless carriers 3.8 million iPhones during its fiscal second quarter, which ended March 28. RIM shipped 7.8 million BlackBerrys during its fiscal fourth quarter, which ended Feb. 28.

Tiny particles make LED light more pleasing

NEW YORK | Light-emitting diodes are prime candidates for replacing inefficient incandescent bulbs, but have a few things working against them. They can provide a pleasing warm light or they can be energy-efficient, but they haven’t been able to be both at the same time.

Recently, two small companies showed off an LED lamp that’s both very power-efficient and produces a light similar to that of a standard tungsten or halogen bulb.

The LEDs in the lamp shine through a thin layer of “quantum dots,” a scattering of particles of very small but precisely controlled size. When light hits them, they emit light of a different color, much like the “phosphor” layer of a fluorescent tube. The magic of quantum dots is that the color they emit can be controlled very accurately by adjusting their size, which means less wasted energy and more pleasing color.

The dots are so small that more than 10,000 of them could be lined up over the width of a human hair.

The Quantum Light lamp is made by Nexxus Lighting Inc. of Charlotte, N.C., which demonstrated it at the Light Fair trade show in New York. The lamp will go on sale late this year at an as yet undetermined price.

Device targets mosquitoes with deadly nectar

STATESBORO, Ga. | The ProVector Bt may not look too much like a real flower, but the artificial device sports bright, finely tuned colors and sweet nectar that can lure and kill mosquitoes that potentially carry diseases.

The ProVector uses sugar, chemicals and a biopesticide called Bacillus thuringiensis to attract and kill the bugs.

Results are so far encouraging. Studies conducted by a Walter Reed Army Institute of Research laboratory found the contraption killed half to all of the insects it attracted within days.

Georgia Southern University professor Thomas Kollars, a former U.S. Army entomologist stationed in Southeast Asia, began the project 11 years ago after pondering over the shortcomings with traditional, pesticide-based approaches to fighting mosquitoes.

LOAD COMMENTS ()

 

Click to Read More

Click to Hide